KET
 KET
About KET | TV Schedules | Programs A-Z | Explore by Topic | Support KET  
Arts | Education | Health | Kentucky | Kids & Families | Public Affairs  
Search»
 
 

TV Schedule Book List News by e-Mail About bookclub@ket
Back to bookclub@ket bookclub@ket
October's Book
No Good Deed
by Lynn Hightower

Bill:
It's a classic whodunit: Author Lynn Hightower introduces readers once again to Detective Sonora Blair, a Cincinnati-based homicide policewoman. This time it's the horse business, family tragedy, and of course a surprise ending. It's Lynn Hightower's No Good Deed. bookclub@ket starts now.

Jonathan:
... maybe it comes from a well-known phrase or something, but I'm not really sure what it comes from. Do you have any ideas on the title No Good Deed? It sounds a bit like "one good deed deserves another," but in this case "no good deed." It's a bit of a puzzler.

Bill:
I think some ... Go ahead, Dava.

Dava:
I just look at No Good Deed and I think this book is going to be about a bunch of guilty, underhanded occurrences -- and, well, it is.

[Everyone laughs]

Bill:
It was really about one of those. No, I think somebody said that it was also a publisher's ploy to put this on, but it ...

Jonathan:
Catchy title, but a catchy title should really refer to something that is really in the plot. I suppose it's really about two bad deeds -- the murder of a 15-year-old girl and the theft of a horse.

Dava:
And the cutting off of a finger.

Lynda:
And the stealing of the children.

Jonathan:
Yes. This man has had a series of affairs with women, and every time they break up he steals the child and crosses the country, and then finally [he] settles in Cincinnati with a family of three children -- and none of them are his.

Dava:
Three young girls.

Jonathan:
Yeah.

Bill:
What kind of villain is he -- Dixon Chauncey?

Jonathan:
I find him a little unconvincing, because the way he was depicted by Sonora Blair, the protagonist -- the cop -- he was always looking sheepish and as if he wanted to cry. I just didn't think he was a very convincing character. I couldn't really visualize somebody who is so emotionally fragile, who was always on the verge of crying, and yet who also could have perpetrated this deed. By the way, "perpetrated" I use because the police term for a criminal is a "perp" as in perpetrator. But I didn't find him a convincing character. Did you, Wilma?

Wilma:
Not necessarily. I thought it wasn't clear enough, you know? Any man who would take these children and then when he got pushed to the limit, kill them when he was going to be found out -- he killed at least two: the girl in the novel and, we suspect, a 10-year-old boy earlier -- and yet he's so pitiful and so hangdog. It doesn't sound exactly convincing; it's not very clear.

Lynda:
And a meticulous housekeeper, though.

Wilma:
Oh, absolutely -- and took care of the children completely.

Lynda:
Right, right.

Wilma:
Unless he was going to be found out, and then he just killed them.

Bill:
But I think that sort of adds to a different sort of villain. I mean, what's a villain have to be in other mystery novels and all that?

Lynda:
Unfortunately, didn't you think he was a little suspicious right from the beginning? Because she said early on that he wore his hair in a dull black color, combed straight down, and it looked as if it was dyed. And right away you are told, "This man is suspicious; keep an eye on him."

Jonathan:
Wait a minute. Do you think people that dye their hair are always going to be suspected of murder?

Lynda:
The dull black shoe color of it -- [the fact] that, you know, it had no luster, no light.

Jonathan:
I think she discovered the hair dye in the trash basket in the kitchen, and she used that as evidence.

Lynda:
Yeah.

Bill:
But when she first suspected him -- that was at the very beginning -- there were other usual suspects. There were other people that at that time you really didn't know.

Jonathan:
Who were the other usual suspects for this murder? The young lady of 15 who was abducted with her horse? They finally discovered her corpse, so she was murdered. He became the chief suspect as far as the protagonist was concerned, as far as the cop was concerned. My problem with it was that there were no other leading suspects. I think in a good whodunit you want to have maybe two or three people who seem to have a motive for having done the murder and who maybe display some suspicious behavior, so as the reader you are left guessing. Could it be this, could it be that? Could it be Mr. Smith, could it be Mr. Jones?

Lynda:
And everybody has to have the same ...

Jonathan:
From the get-go she said, "I think it was the father," and you weren't really given another suspect to really chew on.

[Everyone agrees]

Wilma:
The author did something then to take our mind away from [the fact] that that there were no other suspects. She put in the subplot about the stealing of the horses and the cutting off of Donna Delaney's finger, which I thought was one of the more interesting parts of the book.

[Everyone laughs]

Wilma:
At least it seemed original. But then she put us off as if there is something to think about. She has put in this subplot: Who cut off Donna Delaney's finger, and did it have anything to do ...?

Dava:
The detective didn't really vigorously follow up on this lead.

Wilma:
No.

Dava:
They kind of went to horse sales and that's about it. So really Sonora thought from the beginning it was the father, and that's what we thought.

Wilma:
Well, I think what you might be saying ... First of all, there are two things that can be done in a detective novel. One could be a gripping story where the reader is trying to find out exactly what has happened here, and it is suspenseful and it's interesting; we have lots of things to think about. Which this is not. So the only other alternative for a detective story is to have the detective or the policeperson be such an interesting character that we're held there for that reason. And I don't think either one of those is true in this particular novel. I don't think Sonora Blair is an interesting enough character to sustain our interest above the story. If the story is not good, then we have to have a character.

Lynda:
Well, did you like the snappy dialogue, the witty ...?

Wilma:
It was almost too cute.

Lynda:
... female detective.

Wilma:
Don't you think it was too cute, or not?

Lynda:
It wasn't particularly appealing.

Wilma:
Yeah.

Lynda:
But I think that is the whole image -- you know, the wise-cracking girl cop.

Bill:
How does she compare to other girl cops that we have read about?

Wilma:
Well, she is not as good as Kinsey Millhone in Sue Grafton's novels, and I'm not even sure why. I didn't go back and read any of those a second time to compare them. But I have a very, very clear picture of Kinsey Millhone and some of the things that she has donel and she is a tough person. Of course, she is a private detectivel so she can get by with some of the things that Sonora Blair could not. You know -- breaking into houses and that type of thing. But she is a very clear-cut character and a really tough character. And she is very specific about what she likes, what she doesn't like, what her life is about.

Lynda:
Well, one thing Kinsey doesn't have is children.

Wilma:
Or pets, or pets.

Lynda:
Sonora has children, which I think she treats abominably.

Wilma:
Right.

Lynda:
All through the book.

Wilma:
Right, I agree.

Bill:
Well, does that make her a little bit more average, like the regular person on the street? I mean, her day job is [as] a detective and at night she's a house mom.

Lynda:
I think it is supposed to. It's supposed to; I mean, there are ...

[Everyone talks at once]

Dava:
... chore to take care of them, you know. "I've got to cook for those kids."

Bill:
But it is.

Wilma:
She is taking better care of the horse. You know, she is more interested in the horse.

Jonathan:
The thing about it is ...

Lynda:
She does make a meat loaf later on.

Wilma:
Oh yeah, and some raspberry muffins.

Jonathan:
She also makes raspberry muffins for breakfast! Come on ...

[Everyone laughs]

Jonathan:
Don't be ... so give her the benefit of the doubt.

Bill:
Yeah, can you -- can you imagine?

Jonathan:
She is somebody who feels very guilty about her neglect of her children.

Lynda:
She does.

Jonathan:
It crosses her mind quite often. She says, "Oh, I have got to investigate this, and I have got to go to the horse farm, and I have got to interview so and so; oh, and I really worry about those children -- you know they are going to be eating pizza again."

Lynda:
"I have got to go to the grocery story in the midst of everything else." Yeah.

Jonathan:
And it becomes a theme of the whole novel, the way she worries about her kids. And I get an impression that she doesn't always treat them like this. It's only because they find, they find a corpse and they have to solve the murder.

Bill:
It's only in this novel.

Jonathan:
Well, it's only during the period of time when they are searching for the perpetrator of this crime. Remember, she goes home and cooks meat loaf in the middle of the investigation. And she really beats herself -- she said, "Oh my goodness, I hope they don't discover that I went home and took time off to do meat loaf." And I think that that's probably just, just a ...

Lynda:
Well, I think that is realistic, because as a working mom you do make choices.

Jonathan:
It's realistic.

Bill:
I am sitting here thinking, if somebody just tunes in on our discussion ...

[Everybody laughs]

Bill:
... and we have gone through a cut-off finger and making meat loaf and taking care of her horse ...

Wilma:
That pretty much explains the novel.

Jonathan:
Lynn Hightower is trying to create a character who is both a female hard-boiled cop with a heart and also somebody who has a family life. She's a single mother; she's got family to look after. This is a realistic fact about our times. You have lots of people who are single mothers who have to look out for family plus do their job. However, you know there were some problems with the character, I think. I mean, she was believable in many ways, but there was one moment when she did something I couldn't believe. She went to the horse sales and out of the blue she bought a horse. There was no reason given why she bought the horse other than it was a crazy impulse. Did you people feel that that was a problem in this plot -- that she bought this horse?

Wilma:
It was a pretty big problem. I mean, all at once she has a horse, and she's been complaining about not having any money, truly, and worrying that her children maybe don't have the clothes they need. I don't mean that they are poor, but they don't have the popular kinds of clothes. She doesn't have money to buy the extras. And then all at once she has $600 in her checking account and on impulse just buys a horse that she knows nothing about.

Jonathan:
And she is going to have to pay for its boarding and for its being fed and for its being trained, and she wasn't interested in horses prior to this. And she didn't even say it was a particularly nice horse.

[Everyone laughs]

Jonathan:
I mean why did she buy [it]?

Bill:
... or attractive, right?

Dava:
And she never believes anyone's word for it, and [yet] she takes this smarmy guy's word that this is a very nice young Arabian horse.

Wilma:
Yeah, it's an Arabian.

Dava:
She is going to race it in the Kentucky Derby or something ...

Bill:
Lynda hasn't said anything about this impulsive purchase of the horse, though.

Lynda:
Well, you know, I agree it came out of the blue -- I didn't buy it -- but it did set up a scene in the book that was kind of touching, and that's when she and the children were up at 2 in the morning and decided to take a drive.

Jonathan:
[To] pet the horse.

Lynda:
A drive.

Wilma:
That was the only real scene of her with the children. I will have to admit, actually I liked that scene. Other than that, I just thought this idea about having the children -- I almost thought Lynn Hightower perhaps did not have children (although I understand that she does have children). And so I thought, well, she doesn't know anything about children and, you know, the love of them and so on, but that scene did seem nice.

Lynda:
I think it rang true that you feel guilty [about] all the times you have had to short-change the kids, and because of that you do something impulsive like go to the barn at 2 in the morning and have a moment with them.

Jonathan:
Yeah, that was nice; yeah, I see what you are saying.

Wilma:
That was nice; that was OK.

Jonathan:
It was nice, but I just think that psychological moment when she bought the horse -- I couldn't quite fathom that.

Lynda:
Yeah.

Bill:
So the consensus is that Lynn Hightower didn't do a particularly good job of creating this detective, this character. Or are you saying that maybe she was a little short on the motherhood?

Wilma:
Actually, she's quite an interesting character. I think that this is a very plot-driven novel. You read it for plot. If it's anything, it's a page-turner. You do want to discover "whodunit," as they say. But some of the characters seem a little bit two-dimensional. However, Sonora Blair is the closest we have here to a three-dimensional character. At times she is depicted very warmly and with some complexity, and I think she is a living, breathing character. But I am just saying that there are one or two moments when she did something really way off that I couldn't quite take.

Bill:
I agree with you. For the most part, I do buy the part about the difficulty of raising children and not being there when they are home, and I would imagine a policeman's kids ...

Jonathan:
Latchkey kids.

Bill:
... policeperson's life, sure -- up all hours and getting up early in the morning when she is called ...

Jonathan:
Sure.

Bill:
... on the phone to go out and investigate something ...

Lynda:
It took me a while to keep all the characters in mind. I mean there were quite a lot of men in Sonora's life.

Wilma:
Everybody she met!

[Everyone laughs]

Lynda:
Well, I mean platonic -- I mean work relationships.

Wilma:
Those, too.

[Everyone laughs]

Bill:
Let's just ask about that. Lynda, what about her relationship with Sam? I thought that was kind of interesting.

Lynda:
I thought that was interesting. She and her partner had a very close, platonic, loving relationship. You could tell they knew each other and had worked together for years. And he was the nurturing type; he was worried about her and took care of her in some ways.

Bill:
And he was happily married.

Lynda:
Very happily married. Very happily married.

Bill:
Had a family and all that.

Jonathan:
And they exchange lots of ... banter, and, you know ...

Lynda:
Uh huh.

Jonathan:
It reminded me of the sort of buddy relationship you see in TV cops and even movies.

Bill:
Partners.

Jonathan:
Partners. And this banter between them, and making fun of each other, and -- yeah, it was kind of fun at times, you know. You didn't really learn much about Sam, but he was kind of the butt of her jokes, and she was the butt of his jokes.

Bill:
Uh huh.

Jonathan:
So he was OK.

Wilma:
I didn't understand the conversation they had. It was in a heated moment -- and I have forgotten which one -- where he says "I love you," which would be an OK thing to say ...

Jonathan:
That came out of nowhere.

Wilma:
... and then -- I know ...

Bill:
Uh huh.

Wilma:
"You know I love you," and she said, "Well, I don't want those words until you are able to give love, sex, and commitment." And she says, "How about two out of three?" And she said, "Your timing is way off." And I didn't understand that conversation. I didn't understand whether it was a serious conversation -- if they had a relationship before, because this is the first time I have read a Sonora Blair novel -- or whether that was just part of the fun, or what that was.

Jonathan:
The tone was weird because you didn't know.

Wilma:
Yeah, it was weird.

Lynda:
Interesting point. You'll have to do some research on it.

Wilma:
I will have to read another one.

Bill:
Get back to us on that.

[Everyone laughs]

Bill:
But I thought they were kidding -- sort of brotherly, sisterly.

Jonathan:
Kidding, but she seemed to take it ...

Wilma:
Yeah, she took this one point seriously. She said, "Your timing is way off" -- and in an angry kind of way.

Lynda:
Well, she did eventually have a relationship [where] there was no commitment, because ...

Jonathan:
With Mr. McCarty.

Lynda:
Yeah.

Bill:
Hal, Hal McCarty.

Jonathan:
A member of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Wilma:
Yeah.

Jonathan:
Who she originally thought was one of the perps but wasn't. And, well ...

Bill:
He was posing as a veterinarian.

Jonathan:
Yes.

Bill:
Was it?

Jonathan:
Yes.

Dava:
And he has blood on his shirt.

Bill:
Investigating, investigating.

Lynda:
He was the red herring ...

Bill:
The horse business.

Lynda:
... the main red herring, but his true role was revealed very early.

Wilma:
Very early.

Jonathan:
Too early.

[Everyone agrees]

Jonathan:
You needed to have another decoy, somebody else who looked like a real suspect -- perhaps one of the Biskeys. You know, that would have been, that would have been good ...

Lynda:
No.

Jonathan:
... and given them a motive for killing.

Lynda:
What about that family?

Jonathan:
Or one of the teenagers -- if you'd had, you know, somebody in school who was disturbed.

Lynda:
What about that second murder that occurred at that farm?

Jonathan:
Yeah.

Bill:
I thought that was a bit strange to bring all that in. And quite honestly, I'm not sure -- other than just giving a location or a place for some of these to occur -- that, that I must have missed something there. Somebody help me out there with the pond.

Jonathan:
Well, there had been a murder of a child at that lake, at that pond.

Bill:
Uh huh.

Jonathan:
And the parents of that child were still alive and living in the nearby house. And the corpse of Joelle Chauncey was buried in the compost heap.

Bill:
Yes.

Jonathan:
Near their house.

Bill:
The, the girl ...

Jonathan:
Somebody took the trouble to drive in and bury a corpse in the compost heap ...

Bill:
That was also where they found ...

Jonathan:
... compost heap outside their house, and they didn't notice.

Bill:
That's also where they found the truck, is it not?

Everyone:
Yes.

Bill:
OK. There is the -- there's the link.

Dava:
... owned the truck and the trailer.

Wilma:
It was their truck.

Bill:
The truck and the trailer.

Wilma:
Uh huh.

Dava:
Right.

Jonathan:
Yeah, and then at the very end of the novel, she's looking at the lake and she thinks she sees two teenagers playing there.

Wilma:
Teenagers.

Lynda:
Two teenagers.

Jonathan:
"But likely it wasn't anything more than a trick of the dusky light, the distance, the sunset glare in her eyes, and wishful thinking." Yeah. So it comes back to that lake scene, comes back as ... It's kind of a cursed place, isn't it?

Bill:
What were some of the other, as Lynda mentioned, red herrings? Some of the other diversions in the whole novel?

Wilma:
Well, the big one was the cutting off of the finger, because we got off track there a little bit -- which was OK -- onto that crime, thinking that maybe totally tied in, which it was very loosely tied in but not specifically.

Lynda:
But you have to mention, too, that it wasn't just that the finger was cut off. It was ...

Dava:
Oh, yeah.

Lynda:
... It was done with surgical precision.

Wilma:
Surgically. Right. Surgically -- and bandaged.

Lynda:
Bandaged.

Bill:
Uh huh.

[Everyone talks at once]

Lynda:
The woman never knew what hit her until she woke up.

Dava:
And then he -- the person who cut the finger off -- returned the finger and put it in a glove.

Bill:
A riding glove.

Wilma:
And not only that ... This was a pretty big feat -- to drug a woman, cut off her finger ...

Bill:
It was a finger.

Wilma:
... surgically, yeah. Surgically take it off, cut off her finger, and bandage it -- do everything really well -- and then we actually meet the man at the end who did that, and he doesn't have a high IQ. I mean, he is rather stupid.

Bill:
Is that, is that the part that you are going to comment on, Dava?

Wilma:
And so ...

Dava:
He's, he's not very smart. He's like, "Well, I returned your finger." First of all, he hides it in a place where you might not ever find it for months, [and] then it's some kind of rotten finger.... I mean I just don't understand it.

Bill:
Now that was -- that's another red herring, is it not? I mean, for a moment there, did you think that -- well, she did, too ...

Lynda:
Well, it was kind of ...

Bill:
... thought he might have been a suspect?

Lynda:
Yeah, to bring this guy in out of the blue whose only role in the book is to cut off a finger ...

Wilma:
And he did it well!

Bill:
He certainly did; let's give him credit there.

Dava:
He was an apprentice to the vet; go figure.

Bill:
Jonathan, you are sitting there wanting to say something, I can tell; it's all over your ...

Jonathan:
No, I am just amused by ...

Bill:
What did you like about the book?

Jonathan:
I, I ...

Bill:
You said you liked the character.

Jonathan:
I think the character I liked most was Sonora Blair. Some of the others seemed a little bit two-dimensional. I liked it towards the end, when the evidence was building up against Dixon Chauncey, the father, and it had page-turning quality then: You wanted to know how ... You knew that they were going to get him, but you wanted to know how they were going to get him, because -- you know, they say there are only so many plots in the world, and the thing is, how is this one going to be told? But the problem with Dixon Chauncey was that she knew from the very early stages ...

Dava:
Exactly.

Jonathan:
... it was him, and yet I wasn't convinced that it was him, and yet there wasn't anybody ... It was just too inevitable, really, I think.

Wilma:
And you know what ...

Jonathan:
But, but I think what I enjoyed -- to get back to your question -- was I enjoyed the, the whodunit aspect towards the end, really. I also enjoyed the conversation between her and the other cops; I think that was quite well done -- the sort of one-liners, you know -- I thought that was quite well done. But, uh ...

Dava:
I like how it involves the fate of the other two daughters at the end, also. Because that was what spurred me on to the end -- to find out what is going to happen to these girls also.

Jonathan:
Do you think that was well described? They were ... she didn't -- perhaps [I should] not reveal it all to the viewers -- but they survived.

Dava:
Yeah.

Jonathan:
But they were there as a murder attempt.

Dava:
And if we are to believe that Dixon Chauncey, you know, was the type of guy who would kill Joelle and then clean her up before he buried her, I guess the whole dressing the girls up before he asphyxiates them in his rental garage could make some sense, if he's -- if we are to believe he is that kind of sick character.

Jonathan:
Do you get to know the girls?

Dava:
No, not the girls.

Jonathan:
No.

Dava:
No, I just ...

Bill:
Well, you got to know -- did we not know that one of them sort of took care of the ... the middle age -- what, 10, 12, or so ... Joelle was, what -- 13, 15?

Everyone:
15.

Bill:
Wasn't it the second daughter, the second girl, [who] sort of took care of the younger girl? I thought that was well done.

Wilma:
My thought on the novel is, first of all this isn't meant to be a great piece of literature, and we shouldn't take it as that. You know, it's an escape piece of literature, and there is a reason to read that, you know, for fun and relaxation and just an interesting time, just a fun thing to read. But I think there are other detective novels that are better than this if we want escape reading and if we're interested in the detective novel. I think there are better ones than this. So maybe that would be my objection to it. It's not strong in its genre. Not that there is anything wrong with a nice detective tale -- I think those can be quite interesting -- but I've seen other books that maybe were more interesting.

Bill:
Lynda, did you like it?

Lynda:
Well, I thought it was a quick read, a good page-turner, entertaining escapist literature, and for that it was fine. I don't come away with any long-lasting perception of Sonora. And you know, I'm more struck by the inconsistencies in the book, or the things that, that just popped up ...

Jonathan:
... don't add up sometimes.

Lynda:
Yeah. In particular, though, the thing that worried me the most, and what I keep thinking about, is that as Sonora investigated Joelle's room -- the 15-year-old who was murdered -- she found stuck in the back of her drawer all these things about missing children that Joelle had been collecting, and they didn't immediately check that computer list. That national ...

Bill:
... children's network or ...

Lynda:
Yeah, and everyone has gone to such trouble to have that available for officers to search -- the national database -- and I thought, my goodness, why didn't they check right away? And the fact that Joelle ...

Bill:
That is a very good point.

Lynda:
Joelle was searching for her natural mom and knew something was up. I thought that story line was quite powerful and quite strong, and I would have wanted to have seen more attention to that.

Bill:
Did you, at that moment that Sonora found those papers in the drawer, suspect that there was a connection there?

Lynda:
Oh yeah. Well, it was ... But I told you, the guy dyed his hair; right away I knew he was guilty, you know. And then, you know, abducted child -- it just rang true to me right from the beginning.

Bill:
Be wary of men or women who dye their hair; is that correct?

Lynda:
It was the way she described the dyed hair that made it pretty obvious.

Bill:
What do you think this means? This is after Sonora and Hal McCarty had met intimately together in the barn loft, and then she discovered that he was married. And they were discussing about his wife and children, and she was quite incensed about all of that, and she is thinking, "There was an obvious affection in his voice when he spoke of them -- the children and the wife -- and she wanted to scream, 'God, I don't understand men,' but she did -- they were just like her." What do you think Lynn Hightower meant there? "They were just like her."

Wilma:
I think it's a bit [of] overwriting.

Jonathan:
Affection for the children, you mean?

Bill:
No, I would imagine that she is saying -- Sonora -- is she not saying men, she didn't understand them, [but] they were just like her?

Jonathan:
Oh, right.

Bill:
... that she did ...

Jonathan:
Couldn't understand herself.

Bill:
She did understand them, really, yeah.

Lynda:
She can compartmentalize her feelings. I mean, I think that's what she has learned to do in her job. She can compartmentalize her feelings and be soft and sweet with the children, tough and mean with the perps, and you know I think that's it -- that she's not all warm and fuzzy; she's ...

Bill:
There were times that ...

Lynda:
... tough and hard.

Bill:
... she was at conflict with herself and her job and her role as a mother and cook and all of that, don't you think? Wilma? You don't think.

Wilma:
See ...

Bill:
The problem with this is ...

Wilma:
The problem with this is I think she is such a weak character that I don't even care. I mean, I know that is hard to say.

Bill:
No, it's not; you just said it.

Wilma:
I just -- I don't care that much to analyze her character, because I don't think it's consistent throughout.... And also, the little excerpt you read? I think it's trite -- I mean, I didn't even like reading that sentence. I remembered the sentence, but I didn't like it.

Jonathan:
I think it's a bit unclear. I think the editor needs to work on that, that last sentence, you know ...

Bill:
All right, I'm ...

Jonathan:
... to make it exactly why.

Bill:
I'm sorry I read it now!

[Everyone laughs]

Dava:
Well, maybe she is the type of woman who kind of wants everything, and when she wants something, she tries to get it. She actively works toward that, and -- well, there is Hal.

Jonathan:
Certainly horses.

Dava:
There is Hal. Yeah, there is Hal; he kind of wanted a little bit of everything, obviously.

Jonathan:
Yeah. He wants to have his cake and eat it.

Bill:
How did it portray the horse business? Favorably?

Jonathan:
Well, you know, the epigraph at the very beginning of the novel says, "I tell you what, this horse business is more crooked than the car business ever thought of being." Did you really feel that the horse business was very crooked? I didn't. It really wasn't a great exposé on the horse business for me.

Bill:
No, no, I don't think so.

Jonathan:
It didn't show a lot of wheeler-dealing in the horse business.

Lynda:
It didn't show a lot of knowledge of the industry.

Jonathan:
The horse sales -- people seemed a little bit eager to sell horses. But I didn't really feel it was a great exposé of enormous skullduggery in the horse business.

Bill:
Well, all of that at the, at the sales, though -- apparently ... I think this was -- well, it was sad, then, that if they weren't, if the horses weren't purchased there, they were going to the glue factory. I certainly don't know the horse industry, but I've been told that does occur.

Wilma:
I thought that the biggest exposé had to do with the good farms not renting their stalls to the rich customers, the rich owners. Because they didn't have enough stalls, they would send the horses out to lesser stables to be stabled, and they weren't taken care of there at all, and yet they were taking money for those horses. And so I thought that was a serious situation in the horse industry -- if indeed that is true.

Jonathan:
Yeah, but you know, that's the epigraph, the quotation at the beginning, as though to suggest that it is going to be a dominating feature of the whole novel ...

Narrator: Remember to check out ket.org and learn more about this book and other bookclub selections, plus enjoy author interviews and discussion boards. You can join the club any time; the address is ket.org.

Bill:
... the author, and then ...

bookclub@ket | TV Schedule | Book List | News by e-Mail | About bookclub | Contact Us


KET Home | About KET | Contact Us | Search | Terms of Use
Jobs/Internships | PressRoom | Privacy Policy |
600 Cooper Drive | Lexington, KY 40502 | (859) 258-7000 | (800) 432-0951 | © Copyright 2011 KET

Privacy Policy Copyright © 2008 KET Webmaster