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Adaptive Reuse

What is adaptive reuse? According to Louisville historian Donna Neary, it means “taking a building that had a use as a factory, a school, a church sometimes, and putting it into a new use that serves the community.”

Several historic Louisville neighborhoods are seeing a boom in adaptive reuse. For examples, you need only travel along West Main and East Market streets downtown, or check out the Mellwood Arts & Entertainment Center farther east. That collection of studio, performance, and retail space started life as a Fischer meat-packing plant.

Louisville Life’s look at the adaptive reuse trend spotlights Work the Metal at the Butchertown Market (1201 Story Ave., 584-2841) and the studio of photographer Angela Anderson.

Louisville’s success at adaptive reuse has gained national attention. In fact, that success was one of the reasons the National Trust for Historic Preservation chose to hold its 2004 national convention in the Derby City.

Program 115
New lives for old Louisville buildings, celebrating Chinese New Year at the Crane House, renovations at the historic U.S. Marine Hospital, and University of Louisville President Jim Ramsey. (#115)