Skip Navigation

 

Louisville Zoo Conservation

Turning 1 year-old is a big deal — especially if you’re a baby elephant!

Born March 18, 2007, Scotty the African elephant is the first elephant to be born at the Louisville Zoo. He's also the first elephant to be born in the state of Kentucky! With elephants disappearing in the wild at a rate of about 100 per day, conservation efforts are critical, and Scotty's birth even more significant.

In this Louisville Life segment, we visit the zoo's popular pachyderms (Scotty, mom Mikki, and aunt Punch) and staff to find out more about the elephant breeding program and the Species Survival Plan. Watch as Scotty grows up before your eyes and learn about some of the zoo's other conservation programs, including Glacier Run.

The Louisville Zoo, a non-profit organization and state zoo of Kentucky, is dedicated to bettering the bond between people and our planet by providing excellent care for animals, a great experience for visitors, and leadership in scientific research and conservation education. The Zoo is accredited by the American Association of Museums (AAM) and by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA).

Fun facts:

  • Scotty's mother Mikki was artificially inseminated in June 2005.
  • Scotty was the second successful African elephant to be born in North America in 2007.
  • At birth, Scotty was 285 pounds. As of March 15, 2008, he weighed in at 1,030 pounds and measured 4 feet, 3 inches tall (he was a little over 3 feet tall at birth).
  • Scotty made his public debut on Wednesday, April 4, 2007.
  • Scotty's father is a 28-year-old African elephant from the Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium named Jackson.
  • Mikki, who was 21 years-old at Scotty's birth, came to the Louisville Zoo when she was only two years-old. Elephant Area Supervisor Dave Campbell helped raise her, now he's helping to raise her baby.
  • Scotty's aunt Punch is an Asian elephant, which are also endangered.
  • Along with Scotty, there were several other 2007 births at the Louisville Zoo, including: a pygmy hippo, three maned wolves, a bongo, a siamang, and an ocelot.
  • Click here to learn more about conservation at the Louisville Zoo.
Program 218
Louisville Zoo conservation, Rebecca Ruth Candy factory tour, plus the history of long-time Louisville florists Nanz & Kraft. We're joined on the set by guest Linda Valentine, executive director of the Presbyterian General Assembly Council (USA). (#218)