Living the Story: The Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky
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The Rest of the Story: Interview Videos

As part of the Civil Rights in Kentucky Oral History Project, the Kentucky Oral History Commission and Historical Society have produced full-length video interviews with many of the project participants under the title Living the Story: The Rest of the Story. This series of 14 videos, most an hour long, contains unedited versions of original one-on-one interviews that were excerpted for the Living the Story television documentary. The interviews are available for viewing online.


Program Descriptions

Following is a list of the interviews in Living the Story: The Rest of the Story. Our Biographies section includes additional information on each participant.

  1. Julian Bond—Chairman of the board of directors of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Bond worked for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and served in the Georgia House of Representatives before being ejected for his stand against the Vietnam War. Bond, who has family roots in Kentucky, also served as narrator for the Living the Story documentary.
    Watch the Video | Biography

  2. Gov. Edward Breathitt—As governor of Kentucky in the mid-1960s, Breathitt worked for passage of a state law guaranteeing equal rights in the area of public accommodations. Because of his activism among his fellow governors, President Lyndon Johnson appointed him to a special commission formed to monitor compliance with the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
    Watch the Video | Biography

  3. Sen. Georgia Davis Powers—Powers was the first African American elected to the Kentucky Senate. First elected in 1968, she served for 21 years and championed bills prohibiting discrimination by race, sex, and age. Previously, she had helped organize the 1964 civil rights March on Frankfort.
    Watch the Video | Biography

  4. John Jay Johnson—Johnson began his civil rights activism as a teenager, as the youngest president of any Kentucky chapter of the NAACP. He now serves on the national NAACP staff.
    Watch the Video | Biography

  5. Mervin Aubespin—The first African-American news artist hired by the Louisville Courier-Journal, Aubespin got a baptism by fire as a reporter during two days of rioting in Louisville in 1968. He has built a national reputation as an expert on racism and the media and is president of the National Association of Black Journalists.
    Watch the Video | Biography

  6. P.G. Peeples—Peeples attended the University of Kentucky as one of only about 50 black students, then went to work for the Lexington chapter of the National Urban League. He was soon named director of the chapter, a position he still holds.
    Watch the Video | Biography

  7. Abby Marlatt—While teaching at the University of Kentucky in the 1960s, Marlatt helped organize students and train them in the principles of nonviolent protest, joining them at sit-ins and other actions that led to the desegregation of many public facilities in Lexington.
    Watch the Video | Biography

  8. J. Blaine Hudson—Louisville native Hudson was a student activist at the University of Louisville, demonstrating on behalf of greater educational opportunities for African-American students. He is now a professor and chair of Pan-African Studies at U of L.
    Watch the Video | Biography

  9. James Howard—At age 13, Howard and several other black students drew national attention for their efforts to integrate the schools in the Western Kentucky town of Sturgis.
    Watch the Video | Biography

  10. Jennie and Alice Wilson—Jennie Wilson was born in Mayfield in 1900 to parents who had been slaves. Alice Wilson was one of 10 African-American students who decided to enroll at Mayfield High School shortly after the Brown v. Board of Education decision declared “separate but equal” schools unconstitutional.
    Watch the Video | Jennie Wilson Biography | Alice Wilson Biography

  11. Raoul Cunningham—As a teenager, Cunningham was one of the student leaders who organized protests at segregated downtown Louisville theaters, lunch counters, restaurants, and businesses, including the “Nothing New for Easter” boycott of stores that would not allow African-American customers to try on clothes.
    Watch the Video | Biography

  12. Audrey Grevious—Grevious served as president of the Lexington chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in the 1960s, working with other local civil rights leaders for peaceful integration of businesses.
    Watch the Video | Biography

  13. Anne Braden—A lifelong activist, Braden became embroiled in one of Louisville’s most notorious incidents of race-based violence when she and her husband, both white, were asked to buy a house in an all-white neighborhood in order to resell it to a black family. The house was bombed, and the Bradens were branded Communist conspirators and tried for sedition in 1954.
    Watch the Video | Biography

  14. Grace Lewis—One of the first African Americans to attend a white school in Jefferson County, Lewis went on to a career in civil service and involvement in other civil rights actions, including the campaign to free activist Angela Davis.
    Watch the Video | Biography

For information on purchasing videotapes of Living the Story: The Rest of the Story, contact the Kentucky Oral History Commission (502) 564-1792

Living the Story > Interview Videos