HISTORY

Going Home (1920-1933)

The National Parks

Going Home (1920-1933)

While visiting the parks was once predominantly the domain of Americans wealthy enough to afford the high-priced train tours, the advent of the automobile allows more people than ever before to visit the parks. Mather embraces this opportunity and works to build more roads in the parks.

The Empire Of Grandeur (1915-1919)

The National Parks

The Empire Of Grandeur (1915-1919)

In the early 20th century, America has a dozen national parks, but they are a haphazard patchwork of special places under the supervision of different federal agencies. The conservation movement, after failing to stop the Hetch Hetchy dam, pushes the government to establish one unified agency to oversee all the parks, leading to the establishment of the National Park Service in 1916.

The Last Refuge (1890-1915)

The National Parks

The Last Refuge (1890-1915)

By the end of the 19th century, widespread industrialization has left many Americans worried about whether the country — once a vast wilderness — will have any pristine land left. At the same time, poachers in the parks are rampant, and visitors think nothing of littering or carving their names near iconic sites like Old Faithful

The Scripture of Nature (1851-1890)

The National Parks

The Scripture of Nature (1851-1890)

In 1851, word spreads across the country of a beautiful area of California’s Yosemite Valley, attracting visitors who wish to exploit the land’s scenery for commercial gain and those who wish to keep it pristine. Among the latter is a Scottish-born wanderer named John Muir, for whom protecting the land becomes a spiritual calling.

Ky. Life: Crittenden’s Watch, Morehead Fish Hatchery, Elwyn Berlekamp and more

Kentucky Life

Ky. Life: Crittenden’s Watch, Morehead Fish Hatchery, Elwyn Berlekamp and more

Lt. John Crittenden's watch survived the Battle of the Little Big Horn, and now resides at the Kentucky Historical Society in Frankfort; the Minor E. Clark Fish Hatchery in Morehead keeps anglers happy; Home Cafe & Marketplace in Bowling Green makes special pizzas and sandwiches; and mathematician Elwyn Berlekamp parlayed his Fort Thomas high school education into a place at MIT, the Digital Revolution, and the stars.

10 Towns that Changed America

10 Towns that Changed America

Take a look at 10 “experimental” towns across the nation that did not evolve organically over time, but instead were designed (or redesigned) from the ground up.

Ben Chandler on His Grandfather’s Role in Baseball History

One to One with Bill Goodman

Ben Chandler on His Grandfather’s Role in Baseball History

Former Congressman Ben Chandler, now executive director of the Kentucky Humanities Council, recounts the important role his grandfather, Albert Benjamin "Happy" Chandler, Sr., played as baseball commissioner in helping Jackie Robinson to become the first African-American to play Major League Baseball in 1947.

Kentucky’s Connection to the Jackie Robinson Story

Bill's Eye Blog

Kentucky’s Connection to the Jackie Robinson Story

Bill Goodman previews his conversation with former Congressman Ben Chandler, who talks about his grandfather, A.B. "Happy" Chandler, and his role in helping to integrate Major League Baseball in 1947.

Jackie Robinson: Part 2

Jackie Robinson

Jackie Robinson: Part 2

A fierce integrationist, Robinson used his immense fame to speak out against the discrimination he saw on and off the field, angering fans, the press, and even teammates who had once celebrated him for “turning the other cheek.”

NOVA: Vikings Unearthed

Nova

NOVA: Vikings Unearthed

Uncover the truth behind the legendary Vikings and their epic journey to the Americas.