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Arts and Humanities


Humanities Connections


The elements of the arts
Grade Levels:
7-12
Length:
15-72 minutes
Taping Rights:
Unlimited
MARC Record:
Downloadable
Web Site:
KET Distance Learning
Program Schedule:
See Below

This KET-produced series introduces the basic elements of various art forms, providing both background information and classroom ideas for teachers and performance and discussion segments to use with students. These short, fast-paced units fuse the wisdom and experience of seasoned performers with our own solid research base. They are written to correspond with Kentucky’s Core Content as well as the National Standards in the Arts.

In addition to demonstrating how art is created, the series explores the why of doing art. Humanities Connections will help students understand the historical and cultural contexts of respected artistic works, explore the idea that art is both a reflection and a catalyst of social and cultural change, and begin to think creatively about their own experiences and about the multicultural society of the 21st century.

As further enrichment for these thematic units, KET has also produced a set of video segments titled “Class Connections,” excerpted from our Humanities Through the Arts distance learning class, that explore a variety of art forms within a particular culture or time period.

Program of Studies:
All Arts and Humanities disciplines: Structure in the Arts, Humanity in the Arts, Purposes for Creating the Arts, Processes in the Arts, Interrelationships Among the Arts


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2011/12 Program Schedule

101. Theater Basics for Teachers (Part 1)
What makes theater magical? This overview of set design, lighting, sound, costumes, actors, and acting in theater includes broad ideas and questions to use as classroom discussion starters.
102. Theater Basics for Teachers (Part 2)
This overview of the history of theater, from ancient Greece to modern Broadway, may also be shown to students. Topics include commedia dell'arte, the Shakespearean stage, and an update on current American theater. Clips from works by Arthur Miller, David Henry Hwang, David Mamet, and Kentuckians Marsha Norman and George C. Wolfe are featured.
103. Theater Basics for Students (Part 1)
Performance clips from A+ show students what to look for in theater and demonstrate acting techniques and the importance of movement, gesture, diction, and improvisation.
104. Theater Basics for Students (Part 2)
Excerpts from a student production of The Crucible and interviews with the participants take students behind the scenes to see how staging, scenery, props, lighting, sound, costumes, and makeup come together.
105. Dance Basics for Teachers
Ideas for how to talk to students about dance and a suggested classroom project, plus a brief history of ballet and specific background information on Tchaikovsky's The Nutcracker, which is featured in the student dance program.
106. Dance Basics for Students
Elements of dance—space, time, and force; how to watch dance; and a complete performance of Act 2 of The Nutcracker, bracketed by a discussion of how dancers approach a work and how two different choreographers can interpret the same story in very different ways.
107. Music Basics for Teachers
Music can be approached in a wide variety of ways: intellectually, emotionally, or even comparatively with a work of art. Another way to listen is to explore the thoughts of a great composer such as Bach. A third way to listen is through a historical perspective. This segment examines the musical "isms."
108. Music Basics for Students
Basic elements of music—melody, harmony, tempo, rhythm, timbre, dynamics; more tools of the musician—motif, cadence, phrases, improvisation, call and response; and a review of all elements.
109. Visual Arts Basics for Teachers
This teacher tape is dedicated to the art of questioning. What is the purpose of a given piece of art? What was the artist's intent? Questions to ask a painter are followed by an interview with Lexington artist Carolyn Hisel. A final question: How do the visual arts parallel, or intersect with, other arts?
110. Visual Arts Basics for Students
Covers elements of art and tools of the artist. Definitions and discussions of each of the elements of art use artists from Kentucky's Humanities Reference Chart as examples. A segment on principles of design shows ways Goya used these principles in The Third of May. "Masterworks" discusses 10 paintings, focusing on how each fit into the culture of its time. Finally, students learn how to apply what they've learned by using the acronym SAGE: See, analyze, guess about, and evaluate any painting.
111. Class Connections: Medieval and Renaissance (Part 1)
Origins of Gothic architecture, Hildegard of Bingen, Chartres Cathedral, Dante and The Inferno, introduction to the Renaissance.
112. Class Connections: Medieval and Renaissance (Part 2)
Giotto and Michelangelo.
113. Class Connections: World Religions (Part 1)
Rabbi Jon Adland; Genesis; the three Daves.
114. Class Connections: World Religions (Part 2)
The Church of Hagia Sophia; Dome of the Rock; Islamic architecture; the Silk Road.
201. Class Connections: The African Cultural Root (Part 1)
Introduction to Africa; African drummer; African dance.
202. Class Connections: The African Cultural Root (Part 2)
African visual art; the modern primitives.
203. Class Connections: Ancient Civilizations (Part 1)
Introduction to Gilgamesh; daily life in ancient Egypt; Giza pyramids; I.M. Pei (the modern pyramid).
204. Class Connections: Ancient Civilizations (Part 2)
American Indian culture.
205. Class Connections: Greece and Rome (Part 1)
Classical architecture; Greek sculpture; later Greek masterpieces.
206. Class Connections: Greece and Rome (Part 2)
Roman portraiture and architecture.
207. Broadcast 1
208. Broadcast 2
209. Broadcast 1
210. Broadcast 2
211. Broadcast 1
212. Broadcast 2
213. Broadcast 1
214. Broadcast 2
301. Class Connections: Realism Through 20th Century (Part 1)
Monet and Debussy; Frank Lloyd Wright; kabuki; Van Gogh.
302. Class Connections: Realism Through 20th Century (Part 2)
The Ballet Russe; Dorothea Lange; Woody Guthrie; Georgia O'Keeffe.
303. Class Connections: Baroque-Neoclassic-Romantic (Part 1)
Introduction to the Baroque era; Caravaggio; Shakespeare's greatest hits; Rubens and Rembrandt; Bach.
304. Class Connections: Baroque-Neoclassic-Romantic (Part 2)
Dance at the court of Louis XIV; the Palace of Versailles; Monticello; Goya.
1001. Theater: Teacher Audience
What makes theater magical? Discussion of set, lighting, sound, costumes, actors, and acting.
1002. Theater: Student Part 3A Performance (Part 1)
See an A+ performance and look for movement, gesture, direction, and improvisation.
1003. Theater: Student Part 3B Performance (Part 2)
See an A+ performance and look for movement, gesture, direction, and improvisation.
1004. Theater: Student Part 4A Production/Crucible Act 1
Students discuss their roles in creating staging, scenery, props, lighting, sound, costumes, and makeup. Edited version of Acts 1, 2, 3, and 4 of The Crucible are intercut with comments from students on their roles in the production.
1005. Theater: Student Crucible Act 2
Students discuss their roles in creating staging, scenery, props, lighting, sound, costumes, and makeup. Edited version of Acts 1, 2, 3, and 4 of The Crucible are intercut with comments from students on their roles in the production.
1006. Theater: Student Crucible Act 3
Students discuss their roles in creating staging, scenery, props, lighting, sound, costumes, and makeup. Edited version of Acts 1, 2, 3, and 4 of The Crucible are intercut with comments from students on their roles in the production.
1007. Theater: Student Crucible Make-Up
Students discuss their roles in creating staging, scenery, props, lighting, sound, costumes, and makeup. Edited version of Acts 1, 2, 3, and 4 of The Crucible are intercut with comments from students on their roles in the production.
1008. Theater: Student Crucible Act 4
Students discuss their roles in creating staging, scenery, props, lighting, sound, costumes, and makeup. Edited version of Acts 1, 2, 3, and 4 of The Crucible are intercut with comments from students on their roles in the production.
1009. Dance: Teacher Audience
How to talk to students about dance, a classroom project idea, a brief history of ballet, and background for The Nutcracker.
1010. Dance: Student Audience
New ways to watch dance: elements of dance: space-time-force, clips from Act 1 of The Nutcracker, discussion of divertissements, full performance, Act 2, The Nutcracker.
1011. Dance: Student Comparison
How two choreographers handle identical sections of The Nutcracker, last half of Act 2.
1012. Music: Teacher Audience
Music can be approached in a huge variety of ways - intellectually, emotionally, or even viewed comparatively with a work of art. This segment examines the musical "ism's."
1013. Music: Student Audience
Basic elements of music, tools of the musician, and a review of all elements.
1014. Visual Arts: Teacher Audience
The art of questioning, an interview with Lexington artist Carolyn Hisel, and how the visual arts intersect with other arts.
1015. Visual Arts: Student Audience
Elements of art, the tools of the artist, and discussion of ten paintings - focusing on how they fit into the culture of their times.

These videos are also available on KET EncycloMedia.

Your time zone has not been set. We invite you to customize our pages to your own time zone. In the meantime, all times default to Eastern Time.



Teaching Materials

Teachers who wish to use the Humanities Connections materials, including an extensive collection of online lesson plans, should register each year with KET. Registration is free. Register online at the Humanities Connections web site, or call (800) 333-9764. Videos of the programs are also available to registered participants.



Kentucky Academic Expectations

This program relates to the following Kentucky Academic Expectations.

Kentucky schools may tape and retain programs according to the rights listed above. For further information, contact the KET Education Division.

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Last Updated: Friday, 10-Aug-2012 03:17:05 EDT