CSS is not available in your browser. Though all content is accessible, the page will not appear as intended.

Skip Navigation

 



Social Studies


Colonial Williamsburg Field Trips


Bring the past alive in the classroom
Grade Levels:
4-12
Length:
60 minutes
Taping Rights:
10 days
MARC Record:
Downloadable
Web Site:
www.history.org
Teaching Materials:
See Below
Program Schedule:
See Below

Teach American history from east to west in the new Electronic Field Trip season from Colonial Williamsburg. The interactive lessons bring Native Americans, the authors of the Constitution, settlers, explorers, enslaved Africans, young Americans, and conservators to your classroom. Visit the History & Education section of the Colonial Williamsburg web site for a wide variety of classroom resources.

Teachers who register for the field trips receive extended taping rights as well as access to accompanying classroom materials.

Program of Studies:
Social Studies: Government and Civics, Historical Perspectives


Your time zone has not been set. We invite you to customize our pages to your own time zone. In the meantime, all times default to Eastern Time.

2012/13 Program Schedule

101. In the General's Secret Service
To win a war, the military must keep its secrets; and in every war, spies risk their lives to uncover those secrets. Learn about British and American spies and the secret war behind the American Revolution.
102. The Case of the Shuttered Room
Young history sleuths enlist the aid of Colonial Williamsburg curators, historians, and archaeologists to learn how the artifacts from the William Waters House help solve the mystery of the people who lived there.
103. The April Conspiracy
Marches with British troops in April 1775 as they seize colonial weapons and powder in Massachusetts and Virginia, then joins the American patriots in the confrontations at Lexington, Concord, and Williamsburg that launched the Revolution.
104. Influenced by None
Freedom of the press is a principle that Americans now take for granted. But 18th-century printers were not free to express an independent point of view. This program explores the world of Clementina Rind, printer of The Virginia Gazette in pre-Revolution America.
105. Chained to the Land
Plantation owners exploited the slave labor of African Americans to create a successful agricultural economy. The voices of slaves and masters explore the economic, social, and racial development of plantation life.
106. Jefferson's West
Thomas Jefferson secured the American West and the future of the United States with the Louisiana Purchase. Join the third president as he examines the flora, fauna, and Indian artifacts collected by Lewis and Clark's Corps of Discovery and reflects on the significance of their mission.
107. Crossroads
Travels through Colonial Virginia the way people did in the 18th century—on horseback, in a carriage, and on foot.
201. Soldier of Liberty
A young recruit, Nathaniel Hutcheson, enlists in the 2nd Virginia Regiment and experiences the everyday life of a soldier on the eve of the American Revolution. Then he marches into battle for his first encounter with the noise, confusion, and horrors of war.
202. Missions to America
Travels to America's first English settlement, a French Great Lakes mission, and a Spanish ranch in the Southwest to explore how different European nations colonized North America.
203. A Day in the Life
A day in Williamsburg during Colonial times as seen through the eyes of an apprenticed boy, a well-to-do young lady, and a slave.
204. The Rare Breeds
How work animals were used in colonial Virginia and the importance Colonial Williamsburg places on preserving rare breeds in re-creating the life and times of early America.
205. Flames of Freedom
Frederick Douglass narrates a history of slave rebellions, examining how African Americans resisted slavery from Colonial times to John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry.
206. A Publick Education
A free, public education for every American was not always the standard. Horace Mann traces methods of education from the Colonial period to the one-room schoolhouses of the 1840s.
207. Mr. Alderson's Farm
Explores the rural traditions, self-reliance, economy, and seasonal rhythms of farming—the occupation of most Americans during the 18th and 19th centuries.
301. Taxes, Tea, and Tyranny
Though Americans protested British taxation for nearly two years, the Boston Tea Party in 1773 was the final spark that united the colonies against Great Britain.
302. Hostages of Two Worlds
At Williamsburg's Brafferton School, Native American children were taught to become "civilized Englishmen." Caught between two worlds, these children exemplify the clash of cultures that has continued throughout American history.
303. Degrees of Latitude
Charting the New World was the task of American surveyors and European mapmakers. A look at the craftsmanship and importance of 18th-century cartography reveals the geography of a rapidly changing world.
304. In the General's Secret Service
To win a war, the military must keep its secrets. But in every war, spies risk their lives to uncover those secrets. Stories of both British and American spies reveal the "secret war" beneath the American Revolution.
305. No Master Over Me
Ann Ashby tells the story of her life as a free black during the days of slavery—a life spent delicately balanced between the slave and white communities.
306. For Ready Money
A look at how the Colonial economy worked, as seen through the eyes of a young apprentice learning about money, accounts, notes, and credit.
307. Jefferson's West
President Thomas Jefferson examines the flora, fauna, and American Indian artifacts collected by Lewis and Clark and their Corps of Discovery and reflects on the significance of their mission.
401. The Industrious Tradesmen
Follows the lives of several journeymen as they leave their apprenticeships behind and try to make their way on their own in various trades and businesses.
402. In Pursuit of Science
A young boy explores science in the world around him and learns about some of the important scientific discoveries made in Colonial America.
403. Remember the Ladies
Examines the roles, responsibilities, and daily activities of early American women.
501. Yorktown
Explores the siege of the small town of York in October 1781, which brought the American Revolution to an end, from the perspectives of military planners, soldiers, and civilians in the town.
502. Buying Respectability
Explores the "consumer revolution" of the 18th century, including economic changes brought about by a growing demand for goods and services, the status symbols that separated one class from another, social mobility, taxation, the monetary system, and the impact of British mercantilism on the American colonies.
503. The Slave Trade
Perspectives on the 1807 law that abolished the trans-Atlantic slave trade from slaves, plantation owners, slave ship captains, seamen, government officials, Navy officers, and anti-slavery activists.
504. Made in America
A trip through three centuries of American history to explore how revolutions in technology have affected labor, families, and people's perceptions of their jobs.
505. Jamestown Unearthed
A look at how history is written and rewritten as new information comes to light and new methods of study are introduced, using changing views of the 1607 founding of Jamestown as an example.
601. Emissaries of Peace
Follows the 1762 journey of Cherokee leader Ostenaco and Virginian Henry Timberlake from Chota, the capital of the Cherokee nation, to Williamsburg and London. With the French and Indian War raging west of the Alleghenies, the two hoped to forge a lasting peace while preserving the Cherokees' independence.
602. Founders or Traitors
In late 1776, Edward Rutledge, Benjamin Franklin, and John Adams attend a conference with British admiral Lord Howe, hoping to end the American rebellion peacefully.
603. Treasure Keepers
Explores how museum conservators preserve documents and artifacts from the past and the techniques they use to prevent or slow damage caused by passage of time and exposure to elements.
701. The Will of the People
Thomas Jefferson explains that negative campaigning, partisan politics, and contested elections have been part of our political system since the earliest days of the republic.
702. Making History Live
A behind-the-scenes look at how historical African American character portrayals are created for Colonial Williamsburg's Historic Area. From research through performance, experienced museum interpreters share their techniques for bringing the past to life.
703. Freedom Bound
Choice, hope, and escape from slavery are highlighted in stories spanning three centuries. Examines the options for slaves willing to risk their lives for freedom.
801. A More Perfect Union
During the turbulent era of the French and Indian War, the Cherokee people struggled to preserve their independence. Follow Cherokee leader Ostenaco and Virginian Henry Timberlake on their 1762 journey from Chota (the capital of the Cherokee nation).
802. Westward!
Explore the story of the early days of American westward expansion. Daniel Boone recounts the exciting experiences and unexpected consequences associated with moving west. Learn about the risks and grueling personal hardships of creating new settlements.
803. The Rights of Youth
Imprisonment, whipping, forced transportation, and even death were some of the punishments that courts sentenced children to in the eighteenth century. Witness how justice was administered at a time when criminal laws and sentencing guidelines made few or no exceptions for children.
901. The Bill of Rights
Root for student contestants as they compete to discover the physics, chemistry, and simple machines employed by Colonial Williamsburg's tradespeople to reconstruct an eighteenth-century coffeehouse. Quirky "Professor Eddie" hosts this engaging science game show.
902. The Amazing Trade Shop Science Race!
903. Freedom Bound
Explore the excitement, peril, and individual stories of Deborah Sampson, Mary Perth, Martha Washington, and other women, on both sides of the conflict, who proved their mettle in America's war for independence.
904. Women of the Revolution
Explore the excitement, peril, and individual stories of Deborah Sampson, Mary Perth, Martha Washington, and other women, on both sides of the conflict, who proved their mettle in America's war for independence.
1001. Harsh World, This World
What was slavery really like for enslaved people and their masters? Traditional proverbs guide students through personal stories, based on primary sources, showing kindness, betrayal, trust, cruelty, and the many emotions that govern complex human relationships.
1002. The War of 1812
A generation after the Revolution, Americans were once again plunged into war with Great Britain. Why? Join Henry Clay, Tecumseh, Andrew Jackson, James Madison, and others as they struggle to determine what course the United States will take.
1003. When Freedom Came
Everyone knows Abraham Lincoln freed all the slaves - or did he? Freedom came to enslaved people over the course of many months and years - and it arrived in different ways in different places. Discover how enslaved Americans made everyday choices during the Civil War that helped bring about their freedom.
1004. Remember The Ladies
In 1776, Abigail Adams requested that her husband, future president John Adams, "remember the ladies" when establishing the government and laws of the new nation. Examine the roles, responsibilities, and daily activities of early American women.
1005. The Rights of Youth
Imprisonment, whipping, forced transportation, and even death were some of the punishments that courts sentenced children to in the eighteenth century. Witness how justice was administered at a time when criminal laws and sentencing guidelines made few or no exceptions for children.



Kentucky Academic Expectations

This program relates to the following Kentucky Academic Expectations.

Kentucky schools may tape and retain programs according to the rights listed above. For further information, contact the KET Education Division.

PREVIOUS
Tracks: Impressions of America
NEXT
Historic Archaeology: Beneath Kentucky's Fields and Streets


Browse by Selecting a and/or Area
and/or

KET Educational Links
Education | P-12 On-Air | ITV Videos Home

Curriculum Areas
Arts & Humanities | Field Trips | Foreign Language | Mathematics | Practical Living/Vocational Studies
Reading/Writing | Secondary GED | Science | Social Studies | Technology/Media
Professional Development

MARC Records | KY Academic Expectations | Search/Browse | Printable Catalog

600 Cooper Drive, Lexington, KY 40502 (859) 258-7000 (800) 432-0951

Last Updated: Thursday, 23-Oct-2014 03:12:17 EDT