KENTUCKY

Bill's Eye Blog

A Kentucky Scientist Kayaks the Mississippi

In late June Alyssum Pohl put her kayak in at the source of the Mississippi River and will spend the next few months paddling its entire 2,300-mile length. The Lexington native took a brief break this week to speak with KET's Bill Goodman about her journey and the water quality research she's conducting along the way.

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Kentucky Tonight

Legislators Preview Election 2015

Bill and his guests discuss issues impacting the upcoming November election and next year's General Assembly. Guests: Kentucky Senate President Robert Stivers, R-Manchester; Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg; Kentucky House Minority Floor Leader Jeff Hoover, R-Jamestown; and Kentucky Senate Minority Floor Leader Ray Jones, D-Pikeville.

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One to One with Bill Goodman

Education Chief Reflects on Service

Terry Holliday, who is retiring this month from his post as Kentucky education commissioner, talks about the progress state schools have made during his service and advice he'll leave for his successor.

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Kentucky Life

Forsaken, But Not Always Forgotten

Our theme this weekend is "Abandoned Kentucky." In Muhlenberg County, the ruins of an 1850s iron furnace are all that remain of Old Airdrie. The town of Beauty, in Martin County, stands on the site of what once was the Hungarian community of Himlerville. Photographer Sherman Cahal explores the deserted Old Crow Distillery in Frankfort. In Louisville, the preservation of a historic house was accomplished through the efforts of an ice cream shop.

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Louisville Life

Thomas Merton’s Centennial

The monk Thomas Merton was born 100 years ago. Explore his life with a look at a new play about him and a visit to Bellarmine University, the official repository of his archives. We also delve into the many recreation opportunities at Louisville's Olmsted Parks, and Candyce Clifft interviews Mark Wourms, executive director of Bernheim Forest.

Dropping Back In

Louisville Youthbuild Provides Hands-on Preparation for the Future

Forty-five years ago in Harlem, N.Y., a woman saw young people standing around on street corners and near abandoned buildings day after day, doing nothing. She asked them, “If you could do anything to get yourself on track, what would it be?” They said they would fix up the houses and make it so young people could live in them. The woman went on to found YouthBuild, a program that works with young people aged 16 to 24, helping them earn high school diplomas or equivalencies while learning job skills and improving their communities.

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One to One with Bill Goodman

Making the Case for Higher Academic Standards

James Allen, CEO of Hilliard Lyons, talks with Bill Goodman about his support for higher academic standards and explains why he believes those standards will result in a better prepared workforce and stronger economy. Allen is the current board chairman of the Jefferson County Public Education Foundation, a non-profit organization that works to provide financial support for Jefferson County Public Schools and its initiatives.

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Kentucky Life

SS Sultana: The Greatest Maritime Disaster in U.S. History

The greatest maritime disaster in U.S. history occurred on April 27, 1865, when the SS Sultana exploded on the Mississippi River and an estimated 1,800 passengers died, including 194 from Kentucky.

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Louisville Life

Explore Science, Books, and More

This week we take in the sights and sounds of the Kentucky Science Center in downtown Louisville. We also visit the Louisville Free Public Library's Southwest Regional branch, remember Mayor Charles Farnsley, and learn more about Operation Parent. In the studio, Candyce Clifft interviews Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer.

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From the Stone Age to the Space Age

History comes alive through an examination with host Barry Bernson of the artifacts around us. Included are modern Kentucky icons: Bill Monroe's mandolin, Harland Sanders' original pressure cooker, and an Adolph Rupp model basketball. The objects span the course of time from 1000 A.D. to 2013, from a stone axe to a space satellite.