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Contents:
Program 103

1. 4-H horse camp
2. Churchill Weavers
3. the Freedom Singers
4. Bernheim Forest
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For more information:
4-H/Youth Development Programs, College of Agriculture, University of Kentucky, Room 212 Scovell Hall, Lexington, KY 40546-0064, (859) 257-5961

Producer/videographer: Gale Worth
Editor: Esther Reed


Harness, Hooves, Handling, and Hay?

4-H horse camp

Actually, the 4 H’s in 4-H are head, heart, hands, and health. But in this segment, some young participants in one of the youth development organization’s many programs are learning all about caring for horses. As these kids from Falmouth and Carrollton learn “the ropes” of equine care, they also learn responsibility and maturity.

In Kentucky, 4-H is a program of the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture’s Cooperative Extension Service. Hundreds of thousands of Kentucky youngsters—only about 17% of them from rural areas, according to 2001 figures—participate in its wide range of projects designed to help kids explore careers, exercise thinking and decision-making skills, raise their own self-esteem, and develop concern for others and for community.

Nationally, 4-H celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2002.

Watch This Story (7:16)





Producer: Charlee Heaton Pagoulatos
Videographer: Gale Worth
Editor: Esther Reed


Looming Large

Churchill Weavers

The small town of Berea in Madison County is a regional center of arts and crafts, where visitors can buy the things they’ve watched being made by hand. This profile visits one of the best known of the town’s enterprises, Churchill Weavers.

Founded by David Carroll Churchill and his wife, Eleanor, in 1922, Churchill Weavers is known for its beautiful hand-loomed goods, especially blankets and throws. David, an inventor of some note (he is credited, for instance, with the first retractable landing-gear system for airplanes), had built several hand looms as a way of boosting the local economy while doing missionary work in India. When he and his wife later settled in Kentucky, he continued refining his loom design, while Eleanor created her own designs in thread.

Our tour guide for this visit was then-owner Lila Bellando. She has since sold the company to Three Weavers, based in Lafayette, IN.

Watch This Story (4:34)

Bonus Video: Eleanor Churchill from KET’s Distinguished Kentuckian (1976)





For more information:
• Charles Neblett, P.O. Box 868, Russellville, KY 42276

Producer: Charlee Heaton Pagoulatos
Videographers: Gale Worth, David Brinkley, Becky Newton


Inspirational Music

The Freedom Singers

Our third segment presents a glimpse of the history of the civil rights movement—not to mention some rousing music. During the 1960s, the Freedom Singers traveled throughout the South spreading the message of unity through song. Today, they are still traveling, performing songs of the movement and talking about the struggle to a new generation of young people.

the Freedom Singers in performance The lineup of singers seen in this performance, taped in Louisville, includes Charles Neblett, Rutha Harris, Cleo Kennedy, Betty Mae Fikes, and Cordell Reagon. Neblett, the group manager, lives in Logan County, where he also was the first African American elected magistrate. He, Harris, and Reagon were founding members of the Freedom Singers, created in 1962 to help raise money for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

This segment is from the hour-long KET production Sing Out for Freedom.

Watch This Story (7:11)





For more information:
Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest, State Highway 245, P.O. Box 130, Clermont, KY 40110, (502) 955-8512

Producer: Megan Moloney
Videographer: David Brinkley
Editor: Esther Reed


A Gift of Nature

Bernheim Forest

The Bernheim Forest and Arboretum were created out of rolling Central Kentucky farmland. The preserve represents the vision of I.W. Bernheim, an immigrant who made good in Louisville and wanted to create a beautiful park as a gift to his adopted community. As brought to life by architects from the famed Frederick Law Olmsted firm, Bernheim is a place where people can go and meditate, stroll among gardens and works of art, or just enjoy the outdoors.

Bernheim Forest is located in Bullitt and Nelson counties. To get there, take exit 112 off Interstate 65.

This segment was taped in 1995. Kentucky Life made a return visit to Bernheim Forest a few years later, for Program 818.

Watch This Story (3:16)


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