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Contents:
Program 1908

1. Aguilar's Stone Masonry
2. Historical Marker 640—The Home of Governor Fields
3. Bluegrass Motorcycle Museum
4. Our Town—Barbourville
5. Jane's Saddlebag
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Season 19 Menu


Harrison County

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Aguilar's Stone Masonry

Producer: Valerie Trimble
Videographer: David Dampier
Audio: Roger Tremaine, Doug Collins, Sean Anderson, Brent Abshear
Editor: Jim Piston


Aguilar's Stone Masonry

Cecil Aguilar is a rare craftsman—he is among fewer than 10 stonemasons in Kentucky to have achieved master certification from the Dry Stone Conservancy. Since taking a DSC workshop a little over a decade ago, Aguilar has started a successful family stonemasonry business in Harrison County, working all over the state and on national park projects across the country.

Most of Kentucky's drystone walls were originally built by Scotch and Irish masons. However, a revival of the art is creating opportunities for craftsmen today to learn the trade. Originally from Mexico, Aguilar was inspired in his childhood by watching his father, Jesus Aguilar, work with stone.

Mexico's ancient stone pyramids also inspired him. He has visited the Aztec city of Teotihuacan and its Pyramid of the Sun, and has studied the Mayan ruins of Chichén Itzá, site of the stepped pyramid known as El Castillo.

Today Cecil, his father, and brother Rigoberto build dry stone zs well as mortared walls and fences and retaining walls. We take a look at their stonemasonry work at Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill and Louisville's Parklands of Floyd's Fork.

 



Carter County

More Like This From Kentucky Life:
Kentucky Historical Markers

Producer: Jim Piston


Historical Marker 640—The Home of Governor Fields

He was known as "Honest Bill from Olive Hill." William Jason Fields, a Democrat, served as Kentucky's governor during the Roaring '20s, from 1923-27.

Fields is known for his support of funding for teacher colleges at Murray and Morehead. (His wife, Dora, served on the Morehead Board of Regents during his term as governor, and a dormitory is named after her.) However, one of his top priorities, a $75 million bond issue for roads, was opposed by Louisville newspaperman Robert Worth Bingham and defeated by the voters. Fields later convinced the legislature to increase the gasoline tax to fund highways.

Fields had served in the U.S. Congress for 12 years prior to his election as governor. He served Kentucky again as a commonwealth attorney from 1932-33. He died in 1954.

 



Ohio County

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Bluegrass Motorcycle Museum

Producer/Videographer/Editor: Matt Grimm
Audio Post: Brent Abshear


Bluegrass Motorcycle Museum

Let's rev up our engines—this is a museum that roars. Jack Embry of Hartford displays his collection of vintage motorcycles at his Bluegrass Motorcycle Museum. His passion for motorcycles includes restoring them, and many of these rare bikes are ready to hit the highway. In fact, Embry and his grandson get two 100-year-old motorcycles going at the same time for our cameras.

The Bluegrass Motorcycle Museum is located in Embry's home and is available to tour by appointment only. He shared with us the highlights—more 20 American-made motorcycles as well as motorcycle memorabilia he has collected over the past 30 years.

Since the invention of the first gas-engine motorcycle in 1885, the look of these bikes has changed dramatically. This Kentucky collection features early motorcycles from revered names in the industry—a 1911 Yale, a 1912 Eagle, a 1915 Shaw—as well as later models like Harley Davidsons.

 



KnoxCounty

Producer/Editor: John Schroering
Videographers: John Schroering, Jaxon Combs

Our Town—Barbourville

The Knox County community of Barbourville, nestled in the Appalachian Moutains of Eastern Kentucky, cherishes its vibrant history and culture.

The town was the site of Kentucky's first Civil War battle. The Battle of Barboursville, as it was then known, took place on September 19, 1861. Confederates tried to destroy a Union recruiting camp in the city, and the city's Home Guard tried to stop them. The Confederates outnumbered the Home Guard and defeated them, beginning the South's offensive in Kentucky.

Union College, founded in 1879, is a private Methodist-affiliated liberal arts college. Over half the students are from the Appalachian region. The Union College Redbud Festival of Appalachian Culture is held every spring, celebrating everything from quilts and heirloom plants to music and writing.

The town's Daniel Boone Festival, which remembers the frontier days, has been held since 1948.

 



Boone County

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Jane's Saddlebag

Producer: Dave Shuffett
Videographers: Charles Watson, David Dampier
Audio: Roger Tremaine
Editor: Dan Taulbee

Jane's Saddlebag

What keeps families returning to Jane's Saddlebag year after year? Most likely it's the winning combination of a petting zoo, nature trails, heritage exhibits, and a restaurant with homemade meals.

Owners Brett and Samantha Blackmore and Tony DeNatteo say the 35-acre complex place was named for Brett's grandmother, Jane.

Why is it called Jane's Saddlebag? Saddlebag houses were double-room log structures that shared a central chimney. The double-room structure at Jane's Saddlebag was painstakingly restored and keeps the original footprint with two front doors. The stone smokehouse was restored with the original roof and hanging timbers.

Visitors can also shop for antiques, explore the wine shop, browse for collectibles, and enjoy the replica 1700 flatboat.

 





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