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Contents:
Program 916

1. Schwartz’s Countryside Bake Shop
2. the Living Arts and Science Center
3. powered parachute pilot Steve Thomas
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Logan County

For more information:
• Countryside Bake Shop, (270) 542-8679

Producer: Barbara Deeb
Videographer, editor: David Brinkley


From Esther with Love

Countryside Bake Shop

For Esther Schwartz, baking is a labor of love and even an expression of faith. And as the proprietor of Schwartz’s Countryside Bake Shop in Auburn, she shares the results with her friends and neighbors every day.

Schwartz’s sells a lot of cookies and cakes, each baked one batch at a time using time-tested recipes and methods. But the most popular item at this Logan County dessert-lover’s paradise may be Esther’s pecan pie—declared by some fans to be “the best in the West.”

Watch This Story (8:04)




Fayette County

For more information:
Living Arts and Science Center, 362 N. Martin Luther King Blvd., Lexington, KY 40508, (859) 252-5222

Producer, editor: Joy Flynn
Videographers: Michael Follmer, Amelia Cutadean, Brandon Wickey
Audio: Charlie Bissell


Creative Space

The Living Arts and Science Center

Our next stop is Lexington’s Living Arts and Science Center, where kids—of whatever age—will find room to learn and create.

Located in a refurbished 19th-century house in downtown Lexington, the LASC was founded in 1968 as a community center for art and learning. Hundreds of classes each year give children and adults alike the chance to draw, paint, and try their hands at all sorts of other art and craft projects. The center also has an exhibit space (it used to be a parlor) that hosts shows by both new and established local artists.

Meanwhile, the “Science” part of this nonprofit organization’s name comes from the Science Discovery Room, a popular destination for school groups. The entire room is made over once or twice a year with exhibits and hands-on activities on a particular science theme, from wetlands to beekeeping. Outside, the acre and a half of grounds surrounding the building include a pond and stream for further exploration of a little patch of nature in the heart of the city.

On this visit, Marty Henton, then director of LASC, talks about the activities of the center, which include workshops, field trips, and special events. We also take a look at an art exhibit featuring works by Molly Costich Wilson and Christine Kuhn and watch Molly teaching a class in which kids (including Kiki, pictured above) make and paint plaster masks.

You’ll find more from Marty and the Living Arts and Science Center in our very next edition, Program 917, as we explore traditions of the Mexican holiday Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead).

Watch This Story (8:35)




Calloway County

For more information:
• Steve’s own American Spirit site chronicles his trip across the country.
PowerChutes.com has some general information and links to lots of resources for those who might be interested in trying out a powered parachute.

Producer: Cheryl Beckley
Videographers: David Brinkley, Cheryl Beckley, Stephen Kertis
Editors: Cheryl Beckley, Kristen Churchwell


Chute-ing for the Sky

Powered parachute pilot Steve Thomas

Usually, a parachute is what you use instead of a plane. Once you’re up in the air, it’s an alternate way to get back down to earth in case of emergency or thrill-seeking. But a variation developed in the 1980s called the “powered parachute” actually turns the chute itself into an airplane—one of the very lightest of the ultralights.

The powered parachute uses a parachute as a wing and a small motor for power. The only other amenities are a seat for the pilot (and sometimes an extra one for a student) and steering controls. It’s certainly not the fastest way to fly, with speed topping out around 25 mph. But it requires minimal training, little takeoff room, and no license, and enthusiasts say it’s one of the easiest and safest ways to get into the air. After all, if something goes wrong, your chute is pre-opened.

Steve Thomas of Calloway County is one of those enthusiasts, and he takes us for a little demonstration flight in this segment. A former hiker and rock climber sidelined by back troubles, Steve found a new outlet for his adventurous side with powered parachuting. He’s also not one to think small: Between November 2000 and March 2001, he flew a powered parachute all the way across America, from Oceanside, California, to Jekyll Island, Georgia.

Watch This Story (5:24)


SEASON 9 PROGRAMS: 901902903904905906907908909: Along Highway 62
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