Core Content Connections in “Lincoln: The Kentucky Years”

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SS-EP-4.3.1
Students will describe patterns of human settlement in places and regions on the Earth’s surface.

SS-EP-4.4.1
Students will describe ways people adapt to/modify the physical environment to meet their basic needs (food, shelter, clothing).
DOK 1

SS-EP-4.4.2
Students will describe how the physical environment can both promote and restrict human activities.

SS-EP-5.1.1
Students will use a variety of primary and secondary sources (e.g., artifacts, diaries, timelines) to interpret the past.

SS-EP-5.2.1
Students will identify significant patriotic and historical songs, symbols, monuments/landmarks (e.g., The Star-Spangled Banner, the Underground Railroad, the Statue of Liberty) and patriotic holidays (e.g., Veteran’s Day, Martin Luther King’s birthday, Fourth of July) and explain their historical significance.
DOK 2

Grade 4

SS-04-2.1.1
Students will identify early cultures (Native American, Appalachian, pioneers) in Kentucky and explain their similarities and differences. DOK 2

SS-04-2.3.1
Students will describe various forms of interactions (compromise, cooperation, conflict) that occurred during the early settlement of Kentucky between diverse groups (Native Americans, early settlers).
DOK 2

SS-04-4.1.1
Students will use geographic tools (e.g., maps, charts, graphs) to identify and describe natural resources and other physical characteristics (e.g., major landforms, major bodies of water, weather, climate, roads, bridges) in regions of Kentucky and the United States.
DOK 2

SS-04-4.1.2
Students will use geographic tools to locate major landforms, bodies of water, places and objects in Kentucky by their absolute and relative locations.

SS-04-4.1.3
Students will describe how different factors (e.g. rivers, mountains) influence where human activities were/are located in Kentucky.

SS-04-4.2.1
Students will compare regions in Kentucky and the United States by their human characteristics (e.g., language, settlement patterns, beliefs) and physical characteristics (e.g., climate, landforms, bodies of water).
DOK 2

SS-04-4.3.1
Students will describe patterns of human settlement in regions of Kentucky and explain how these patterns were/are influenced by physical characteristics (e.g., climate, landforms, bodies of water). DOK 2

SS-04-4.4.2
Students will describe how the physical environment (e.g., mountains as barriers for protection, rivers as barriers of transportation) both promoted and restricted human activities during the early settlement of Kentucky.
DOK 2

SS-04-5.1.1
Students will use a variety of primary and secondary sources (e.g., artifacts, diaries, timelines) to describe significant events in the history of Kentucky and interpret different perspectives.
DOK 2

SS-04-5.2.2
Students will identify and compare the cultures of diverse groups and explain why people explored and settled in Kentucky.
DOK 2

Grade 5

SS-05-2.3.1 Students will describe various forms of interactions (compromise, cooperation, conflict) that occurred between diverse groups (e.g., Native Americans, European Explorers, English colonists, British Parliament) in the history of the United States.
DOK 2

SS-05-4.1.1
Students will use geographic tools (e.g., maps, charts, graphs) to identify natural resources and other physical characteristics (e.g., major landforms, major bodies of water, weather, climate, roads, bridges) and analyze patterns of movement and settlement in the United States.
DOK 3

SS-05-4.1.2
Students will use geographic tools to locate and describe major landforms, bodies of water, places and objects in the United States by their absolute location.
DOK 2

SS-05-4.1.3
Students will describe how different factors (e.g. rivers, mountains) influence where human activities were/are located in the United States.

SS-05-4.3.1
Students will explain patterns of human settlement in the early development of the United States and explain how these patterns were influenced by physical characteristics (e.g., climate, landforms, bodies of water).
DOK 2

SS-05-4.4.2
Students will describe how the physical environment (e.g., mountains as barriers for protection, rivers as barriers of transportation) both promoted and restricted human activities during the early settlement of the U.S. (Colonization, Expansion).
DOK 2

SS-05-5.1.1
Students will use a variety of primary and secondary sources (e.g., artifacts, diaries, maps, timelines) to describe significant events in the history of the U.S. and interpret different perspectives.
DOK 3

SS-05-5.2.4
Students will describe significant historical events in each of the broad historical periods and eras in U.S. history (Colonization and Settlement, Revolution and a New Nation, Expansion and Conflict, Industrialization and Immigration, Twentieth Century to Present) and explain cause and effect relationships.
DOK 3

Grade 6

SS-06-5.1.1
Students will use a variety of tools (e.g., primary and secondary sources) to describe and explain historical events and conditions and to analyze the perspectives of different individuals and groups (e.g., gender, race, region, ethnic group, age, economic status, religion, political group) in present day regions

Grade 7

SS-07-5.1.2
Students will explain how history is a series of connected events shaped by multiple cause-and-effect relationships and give examples of those relationships.
DOK 3

Grade 8

SS-08-1.1.2
Students will describe and give examples to support how democratic government in the United States prior to Reconstruction functioned to preserve and protect the rights (e.g., voting), liberty and property of their citizens by making, enacting and enforcing appropriate rules and laws (e.g., constitutions, laws, statutes).
DOK 3

SS-08-2.3.1
Students will explain how conflict and competition (e.g., political, economic, religious, ethnic) occurred among individuals and groups in the United States prior to Reconstruction.
DOK 2

SS-08-2.3.2
Students will explain how compromise and cooperation were possible choices to resolve conflict among individuals and groups in the United States prior to Reconstruction.
DOK 2

SS-08-3.1.2
Students will identify how financial decisions (considering finance and opportunity cost) by individuals and groups impacted historical events in U.S. History prior to Reconstruction.

SS-08-4.1.1
Students will use a variety of geographic tools (maps, photographs, charts, graphs, databases) to interpret patterns and locations on Earth’s surface in United States history prior to Reconstruction.
DOK 3

SS-08-4.1.2
Students will describe how different factors (e.g., rivers, mountains, plains, harbors) affected where human activities were located in the United States prior to Reconstruction.

SS-08-4.3.1
Students will describe patterns of human settlement in the United States prior to Reconstruction and explain how these patterns were influenced by human needs.
DOK 2

SS-08-4.3.2
Students will explain why and give examples of how human populations changed and/or migrated because of factors such as war, disease, economic opportunity and technology in the United States prior to Reconstruction.
DOK 3

SS-08-4.2.1
Students will describe how regions in the U.S. prior to Reconstruction were made distinctive by human characteristics (e.g., dams, roads, urban centers) and physical characteristics (e.g., mountains, bodies of water) that created advantages and disadvantages for human activities (e.g., exploration, migration, trade, settlement).
DOK 2

SS-08-4.4.3
Students will explain how the natural resources of a place or region impact its political, social and economic development in the United States prior to Reconstruction.

SS-08-4.4.2
Students will describe ways in which the physical environment (e.g., natural resources, physical geography, natural disasters) both promoted and limited human activities (e.g., exploration, migration, trade, settlement, development) in the United States prior to Reconstruction.

SS-08-5.1.1
Students will use a variety of tools (e.g., primary and secondary sources) to describe and explain historical events and conditions and to analyze the perspectives of different individuals and groups (e.g., gender, race, region, ethnic group, age, economic status, religion, political group) in U.S. history prior to Reconstruction.
DOK 3

SS-08-5.1.2
Students will explain how history is a series of connected events shaped by multiple cause-and-effect relationships and give examples of those relationships.
DOK 3

SS-08-5.2.2
Students will explain and give examples of how the ideals of equality and personal liberty (rise of individual rights, economic freedom, religious diversity) that developed during the colonial period, were motivations for the American Revolution and proved instrumental in the development of a new nation. DOK 3

SS-08-5.2.3
Students will explain how the growth of democracy and geographic expansion occurred and were significant to the development of the United States prior to Reconstruction. DOK 3

SS-08-5.2.4
Students will describe the political, social, economic and cultural differences (e.g., slavery, tariffs, industrialism vs. agrarianism, federal vs. states' rights) among sections of the U.S. and explain how these differences resulted in the American Civil War.
DOK 3

High School

SS-HS-2.3.1
Students will explain the reasons why conflict and competition (e.g., violence, difference of opinion, stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination, genocide) may develop as cultures emerge in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and the United States (Reconstruction to present).
DOK 2

SS-HS-2.3.2
Students will explain and give examples of how compromise and cooperation are characteristics that influence interaction (e.g., peace studies, treaties, conflict resolution) in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and the United States (Reconstruction to present).
DOK 2

SS-HS-2.1.1
Students will explain how belief systems, knowledge, technology and behavior patterns define cultures and help to explain historical perspectives and events in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and United States (Reconstruction to present).
DOK 2

SS-HS-4.3.1
Students will describe the movement and settlement patterns of people in various places and analyze the causes of that movement and settlement (e.g., push factors such as famines or military conflicts; pull factors such as climate or economic opportunity) and the impacts in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and United States (Reconstruction to present).
DOK 3

SS-HS-4.1.1
Students will use a variety of geographic tools (e.g., maps, globes, photographs, models, satellite images, charts, graphs, databases) to explain and analyze the reasons for the distribution of physical and human features on Earth's surface.
DOK 3

SS-HS-4.1.1
Students will use a variety of geographic tools (e.g., maps, globes, photographs, models, satellite images, charts, graphs, databases) to explain and analyze the reasons for the distribution of physical and human features on Earth's surface.
DOK 3

SS-HS-4.2.4
Students will explain how people from different cultures with different perspectives view regions (e.g., Middle East, Balkans) in different ways, sometimes resulting in conflict in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and United States (Reconstruction to present).

SS-HS-5.1.1
Students will use a variety of tools (e.g., primary and secondary sources, data, artifacts) to analyze perceptions and perspectives (e.g., gender, race, region, ethnic group, nationality, age, economic status, religion, politics, geographic factors) of people and historical events in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and United States History (Reconstruction to present).
DOK 3

SS-HS-5.1.2
Students will analyze how history is a series of connected events shaped by multiple cause and effect relationships, tying past to present.
DOK 3