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Discussion Questions

  1. What makes a person a hero?
  2. Why is Abraham Lincoln considered to be an American hero?
  3. In what ways has Lincoln been honored?
  4. What is Lincoln’s connection to Kentucky?
  5. How has that connection been honored?
  6. Are there any memorials or plaques to honor people in our community?
    Where are they and who do they honor?
  7. Do you think it is important to remember and honor the heroes who have shaped our country?
    Why or why not?
  8. Who do you consider a present-day hero? Why?
  9. What do you think would be a good way to honor this person?
social

Show the video segment “The Man, the Memorial” and as a class or in groups, go over the discussion questions. If working in groups, have each group share out its answers.

Extension: Working individually or in groups, have students create brief presentations about a hero past or present they choose. The presentation should explain why the person is a hero. Create a class display of the heroes identified.

Standards:

SS-P-HP-U-3—Students will understand that history has been impacted by significant individuals and groups.

SS-P-HP-S-3—Students will investigate the significance of patriotic symbols, patriotic songs, patriotic holidays and landmarks (e.g., the flag of the United States, the song “My Country, ’Tis of Thee,” the Fourth of July, Veterans’ Day, the Statue of Liberty)

social

Show students an image of the obverse (front side) of the Lincoln penny. Explain that this design has been used since the first Lincoln penny was issued in 1909. The show images of the reverse sides of the 2009 Lincoln pennies. Show the Kentucky penny first. Ask students to identify what the picture represents. Discuss why this is an appropriate image.

Show the other pennies in random order. Have students arrange the pennies in order of the events they commemorate in Lincoln’s life, doing research as necessary. Discuss: What other events could have been commemorated and how?

Helpful websites:

The United States Mint web site includes images and information about each penny.

Extension: Have students explore history as displayed on other American coins and bills.

Standards:

SS-P-HP-U-3—Students will understand that history has been impacted by significant individuals and groups.

SS-P-HP-S-3—Students will investigate the significance of patriotic symbols, patriotic songs, patriotic holidays and landmarks (e.g., the flag of the United States, the song “My Country, ’Tis of Thee,” the Fourth of July, Veterans’ Day, the Statue of Liberty).

social

Show students images of the 2009 Lincoln commemorative stamps, found at the United States Postal service web site.

Discuss what part of Lincoln’s life each stamp represents. Why do you think the stamp designers did not include Lincoln’s birth in Kentucky? (Point out that the stamps include actual photographs of Lincoln).

Extensions:

  • Compare the stamps to the Lincoln coins. Which events represented overlap?
  • Research other famous Americans who have been commemorated on stamps.

Standards:

SS-P-HP-U-3—Students will understand that history has been impacted by significant individuals and groups.

SS-P-HP-S-3—Students will investigate the significance of patriotic symbols, patriotic songs, patriotic holidays and landmarks (e.g., the flag of the United States, the song “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee,” the Fourth of July, Veterans’ Day, the Statue of Liberty).

social

If there are any memorials, plaques or other sites in your community commemorating a person or event, lead a research project about the site. If possible, take the students there on a field trip. If a visit is not possible, take photos to show students and/or invite speakers to your class to speak about the memorial. Students’ assignment will be to find out why, when, and by whom the memorial was created and to determine if it has national, state, or local significance (or all three).

Extension: As a class brainstorm, what important people or events from your community (past or present) deserve a memorial. Ask each student to choose a person or event and draw a picture of a memorial they think should be built. The memorial could be a building, a park, a sign, a statue, or other form of memorial. Provide time for each to show his or her drawing to the class and explain what it represents.

Standards:

SS-P-HP-U-3—Students will understand that history has been impacted by significant individuals and groups.

SS-P-HP-S-3—Students will investigate the significance of patriotic symbols, patriotic songs, patriotic holidays and landmarks (e.g., the flag of the United States, the song “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee,” the Fourth of July, Veterans’ Day, the Statue of Liberty).

arts

Discuss how stamps and coins are used to commemorate people, ideas, places, and events. Brainstorm a list of people, ideas, places, and events that students think are important relating to a period or place that you are studying or of your community.

Give each child a page with a coin or stamp outline and ask them to create a stamp or coin design. Provide time for each student to show his or her design and explain what it represents.

Helpful web sites:

Extensions:

  • Have each student write a paragraph explaining what their coin or stamp represents and create a class books with the designs and explanatory paragraphs.
  • Study the different design elements on coins and dollar bills (mottos, symbols, etc.) Research the meaning of each design element.

Standards:

AH-P-SA-S-VA2—Students will use the elements of art and principles of design in creating artworks independently and with others;

AH-P-PCA-S-VA1—Students will begin to develop and awareness of the purposes for which artworks are created (e.g., ceremonial, artistic expression, narrative, functional)

AH-P-PCA-S-VA2—Students will create new and experience artworks designed to fulfill a variety of specific purposes

math

Divide the class into small groups. Give each group a handful of pennies and ask them to determine how much their pennies are worth and to write the answer in decimal form. Encourage them to make stacks of ten with their pennies to make the counting process easier and more reliable.

Standards:

MA-P-NPO-S-NS7—Students will be introduced to and use decimals to represent money.

MA-P-M-S-MPA8—Students will identify, compare and order amounts of money using coins and bills and use correct symbols for money.

math

Explain that the original Lincoln pennies (the ones with the wheat on the back) were circulated from 1909 through 1959. The pennies with the Lincoln Memorial on the back were circulated from 1959-2009. The new Lincoln pennies went into circulation in 2009 (February, May, August, and November). Brainstorm with students to figure out how many years each previous penny was in circulation.

Ask if they think there are many of the original Lincoln pennies in circulation. Why or why not?

Invite the class to collect pennies for a week. (Or, obtain rolls of pennies from a local bank.) Create a chart so that they can place their pennies with the Lincoln Memorial on one side and 2009 Lincoln pennies on the other side. Each day, before sorting the coins, ask them to predict which side will have more.

Standards:

MA-P-DAP-S-DR1—Students will make a graph using concrete manipulatives and read data displayed on a concrete graph.

MA-P-DAP-S-P2—Students will compare likely and unlikely outcomes.

MA-P-DAP-S-P3—Students will explore basic concepts of probability through simple experiments.

 

Additional Resources

  • PBS has a hands-on interdisciplinary lesson on Lincoln for primary classes.
  • You can borrow the Lincoln Traveling Trunk from the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park. Materials include reproduction period items such as a writing slate, clay marbles, a log cabin model, clothing, and authentic recipes. Also included are photographs, a curriculum guide, audiovisual resources, and a narrative. For additional information and to reserve a Traveling Trunk for your school call the park at (270) 358- 3137 or write to the following address: Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historical Park, C/O Stephen A. Brown, 2995 Lincoln Farm Road, Hodgenville, Kentucky 42748.
  • KET offers extensive online resources on Lincoln for all grade levels, including video clips, audio clips, lesson plans, a Lincoln and His Times Timeline, and an Abe Across Kentucky interactive quiz.
  • The Lincoln Bicentennial Commission web site offers extensive resources on Lincoln, including lesson plans for all grade levels.
  • The U.S. Mint web site offers coloring sheets of Lincoln coins.

 

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