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Looking at Painting
Looking at Painting
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Kentucky Educational Television
Ideas for Classroom Use: High School/College
Program 1, Segment 3
Ideas: How Artists Choose What To Paint

SEGMENT 1: How Artists Get Started
SEGMENT 2: Process: How Artists Paint
SEGMENT 4: Touchstones: Measuring the Value of Artworks
SEGMENT 5: Ideas: Furthermore


Segment Length: 17 minutes
In-cue: Start with the “Ideas” title which introduces this segment (at approx. 19:29 into the program).
Out-cue: “... so that’s why I paint it.”

Description
The four Realist painters describe why they choose to paint what they do and some of the qualities they want to include in their work.

Keywords
abstract; aesthetic; art elements of shape, color, texture, space, form; landscape; principles of design, including pattern and rhythm; self-portrait; still life; subject matter

Additional Vocabulary
These words may be a springboard for research, discussion, oral presentations, or writings: Romanticism, Impressionism, Classical, pointillism, Georges Seurat, Auguste Renoir, expressive qualities of artworks, illusionistic space

Kentucky Core Content
AH-H-4.1.32, AH-H-4.1.33, AH-H-4.2.31

Discussion Topics
Some questions to ask your students:

  • Laurin Notheisen mentions using a “hook” to involve viewers in her paintings. What might that mean? What does a hook mean when you are talking about a written work?
  • Note how Dal Macon holds his paint brush and supports his painting hand. Why does he work that way?
  • Why would Gaela Erwin—or anyone—want to draw or paint herself numerous times? [Delve into inner self, model always available, don’t have to pay for model, can control work sessions.]
  • What kinds of problems might an artist encounter when searching for just the right prop to use in a painting? Those props might include such things as a chicken with head and feet still attached, as in Gaela Erwin’s painting; a melon like the one in Sheldon Tapley’s still life painting; or special articles of clothing.
  • Why would an artist want to copy work by another artist? [Learn technique, study brush marks, pay homage to artist.] If the artist did a beautiful copy, could that work be displayed as the original work of the copying artist? Why or why not?
  • What would be the pros and cons of developing a painting from a photograph as opposed to doing one from direct observation?


SEGMENT 1: How Artists Get Started
SEGMENT 2: Process: How Artists Paint
SEGMENT 4: Touchstones: Measuring the Value of Artworks
SEGMENT 5: Ideas: Furthermore


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