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Next Kentucky Life explores Kentucky State University’s pawpaw program; rural post offices in Leslie County; and the mystery around Pulaski County’s Short Creek
Visit the Kentucky Life site: www.ket.org/kentuckylife/
On the next Kentucky Life, hosted by Dave Shuffett, the program explores Kentucky State University’s research and domestication of the tropical-tasting pawpaw fruit, and Chef Bob Perry from the University of Kentucky prepares a pawpaw dish; Shuffett takes a trip to Leslie County to learn about rural post offices; and the program takes a look at Pulaski County's Short Creek, a Kentucky Life story chosen by the show’s Facebook fans. The program airs Saturday, Oct. 13 at 8/7 p.m. CT and Sunday, Oct. 14 at 4/3 p.m. CT on KET.

Kentucky State University has the only university program in the world devoted to research and domestication of the pawpaw, the tropical-tasting fruit with a cult following. The pawpaw grows wild in Kentucky and was a staple of the diets of Native Americans and early settlers. In recent years, Kentucky farmers have been looking at the benefits of cultivating the pawpaw as an alternative crop. Kentucky Life takes a look at KSU’s program and meets commercial growers in Versailles and Estill County. Then, Chef Bob Perry from the University of Kentucky’s College of Sustainable Agriculture uses the fruit to cook up something delicious.

Earlier this summer, Kentucky Life’s Facebook fans voted online for a story exploring the mystery around the naming of Pulaski County’s Short Creek. The area is known as a “karst window,” which is a special type of sinkhole with a spring on one end, a surface-flowing stream, and a swallow hole at the other end. Short Creek has been a favorite picnic site in the area for years, and it also attracts the interest of geologists from around the world.

Then, on a trip to Leslie County, Shuffett visits James Bowling, the current postmaster of the post office located in the small town of Essie. They discuss the decline of rural post offices, which serve as an important social center in many of Kentucky’s small communities, and the impact of postal services being more centralized throughout the nation.

Kentucky Life is a KET production, produced by Brandon Wickey. Segment producers include Shuffett, Frank Simkonis and Wickey.

More information about Kentucky Life, including streaming video, is available at ket.org/kentuckylife.


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