HEALTH

Seven U.S. States Now Have Adult Obesity Rates 35 Percent or Higher

PBS NewsHour

Seven U.S. States Now Have Adult Obesity Rates 35 Percent or Higher

Seven U.S. states now have adult obesity rates of 35 percent or higher, up from zero states just five years ago, according to federal data released on Sept. 12. The 2017 data, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, highlight continuing discrepancies in adult obesity rates across geographic areas, race, and education levels. A report from STAT News and PBS NewsHour.

Report: Nearly 30 Percent of Patients Prescribed Opioids Had No Pain Diagnoses

PBS NewsHour

Report: Nearly 30 Percent of Patients Prescribed Opioids Had No Pain Diagnoses

Nearly 30 percent of U.S. patients prescribed opioids by doctors over the course of a decade had no recorded pain diagnosis, according to a new letter published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Researchers analyzed data from 31,943 visits in which a patient age 18 or older received an opioid prescription, but they did not make a conclusion that the resulting prescriptions without pain diagnoses were inappropriate. A report from PBS NewsHour's Laura Santhanam.

A Ruling Against Kentucky’s Medicaid Work Requirements Could Affect Other States

PBS NewsHour

A Ruling Against Kentucky’s Medicaid Work Requirements Could Affect Other States

A federal judge recently ruled against Kentucky’s work requirement for Medicaid recipients after it became the first state to impose the policy. The judge called the mandate “arbitrary and capricious” in a decision that could have an impact on other states looking to implement a similar policy. Sara Rosenbaum, a professor of health law and policy at George Washington University, joins Hari Sreenivasan on PBS NewsHour Weekend.

The U.S. Needs More Doctors. Is Free Medical School the Answer?

PBS NewsHour

The U.S. Needs More Doctors. Is Free Medical School the Answer?

Gretchen Frazee of PBS NewsHour reports on an effort by universities to address a current shortfall of primary care doctors and the threat of a broader physician shortage in future years. Several prominent medical schools are taking new and dramatic steps that could reshape medical training across the nation, an example being New York University, which recently announced that it will offer free tuition to all medical students.

Building Effective Programs to Improve Mental Health

Connections with Renee Shaw

Building Effective Programs to Improve Mental Health

Renee speaks with Marcie Timmerman, executive director of Mental Health America of Kentucky. Timmerman discusses her organization's work to help those suffering from mental illness find effective treatment.

Alexandria’s Angels Program a Collaborative Effort to Help Curb Addiction

Alexandria’s Angels Program a Collaborative Effort to Help Curb Addiction

In this segment from Disrupting the Opioid Epidemic: A KET Forum, KET visits the police department in Alexandria, Ky., to learn about an innovative program. Alexandria's Angels program enlists a police social worker and a group of volunteer “angels” to personally help people enter into treatment and support them as they begin the road to long-term recovery. This clip is part of KET’s Inside Opioid Addiction initiative.

Why Does My Medicare Plan Charge Me More for My Medication?

PBS NewsHour

Why Does My Medicare Plan Charge Me More for My Medication?

In his weekly "Ask Phil" blog, PBS contributor and author Philip Moeller answers readers' questions focusing on topics pertinent to seniors. He gives advice on shopping for drugs that may be available at a lower cost than is covered under Medicare Part D.

Why a Patient Paid a $285 Copay for a $40 Drug

PBS NewsHour

Why a Patient Paid a $285 Copay for a $40 Drug

PBS NewsHour investigates the cost structure of prescription drug copays through insurance companies. Insurance copays are higher than the over-the-counter cost of the drug about 25 percent of the time, according to a study published in March by the University of Southern California’s Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics. Inflated copays could be explained by the role in the pharmaceutical supply chain played by pharmacy benefit managers, or PBMs, according to Geoffrey Joyce, a USC economist who co-authored the study.

Harm Reduction Pharmacy Van Provides Life-Saving Services

Harm Reduction Pharmacy Van Provides Life-Saving Services

In this segment from Disrupting the Opioid Epidemic: A KET Forum, KET spends time with the Kentucky Harm Reduction Pharmacy Van as it visits the Jessamine County Health Department and provides community members with free Naloxone and training on how to use it. This clip is part of KET's Inside Opioid Addiction initiative.

Ashland Student Innovators Help Combat the Opioid Crisis

Ashland Student Innovators Help Combat the Opioid Crisis

In this segment from Disrupting the Opioid Epidemic: A KET Forum, viewers travel to Ashland KY, where a group of middle school students devised an innovative solution to address the issue of discarded syringes. This is part of KET's Inside Opioid Addiction initiative.