HEALTH

Challenges Facing Kentucky’s Children

Connections with Renee Shaw

Challenges Facing Kentucky’s Children

Dr. Terry Brooks, executive director of Kentucky Youth Advocates, talks about data trends in the 2018 KIDS COUNT Data Book concerning the well-being of Kentucky kids.

Funding Cuts, Premium Increases and the Future of Obamacare

The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer

Funding Cuts, Premium Increases and the Future of Obamacare

President Trump’s effort to eliminate the Affordable Care Act was stymied by the Senate last year, but he hasn't stopped trying to undermine it. On PBS NewsHour, William Brangham asks New York Times health care correspondent Margot Sanger-Katz about recent funding reductions for enrollment navigators, whether coverage for preexisting conditions is in jeopardy, and the future of the ACA.

Legislators Create Task Force on Opioid Abuse

Connections with Renee Shaw

Legislators Create Task Force on Opioid Abuse

Renee speaks with State Representatives McKenzie Cantrell and Joni Jenkins of South Louisville about convening a task force of professionals and community members to study and address the opioid abuse epidemic in their district.

The Age Plateau: New Study Suggests, at Certain Age, Risk of Death No Longer Increases

The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer

The Age Plateau: New Study Suggests, at Certain Age, Risk of Death No Longer Increases

A new study in Science suggests that humans haven’t yet hit their limit on longevity and that a person's risk of dying actually decreases after they reach the age of 80 until age 105. These findings, based on demographic research of elderly Italians, add to an ongoing debatea about longevity among medical scientists. A report from STAT News published by PBS NewsHour.

Shining a Spotlight on Epilepsy

Connections with Renee Shaw

Shining a Spotlight on Epilepsy

Renee speaks with filmmaker Tiffany Webb, whose latest documentary, Voice of the Epilepsies airing on KET, chronicles the story of a young girl living with epilepsy and her family's determination to treat the seizure disorder. Webb also discusses her own experience of being diagnosed with epilepsy.

FDA Increasingly Approves Drugs Without Conclusive Proof They Work

The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer

FDA Increasingly Approves Drugs Without Conclusive Proof They Work

Once widely assailed for moving slowly, today the Food and Drug Administration reviews and approves drugs faster than any other regulatory agency in the world. Between 2011 and 2015, the FDA reviewed new drug applications more than 60 days faster on average than did the European Medicines Agency. According to this report from ProPublica and PBS NewsHour, the FDA is increasingly green-lighting expensive drugs despite dangerous or little-known side effects and inconclusive evidence that they curb or cure disease.

Will San Francisco’s Ban on Flavored Tobacco Spark a National Trend?

The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer

Will San Francisco’s Ban on Flavored Tobacco Spark a National Trend?

San Francisco will soon implement the most comprehensive restrictions on e-cigarettes in the country, including all flavored tobacco products from vaping liquids to menthol cigarettes to flavored hookah. Lesley McGlurg of KQED reports on how the ban, which should take effect sometime in July, may influence similar restrictions in cities and states in the future.

Suicide Rates Have Been On the Rise for Years. Here’s What Can Help Those In Crisis

The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer

Suicide Rates Have Been On the Rise for Years. Here’s What Can Help Those In Crisis

The recent deaths of chef and TV host Anthony Bourdain and fashion designer Kate Spade underscored some grim numbers about increases in suicide rates. The latest CDC report found that 54 percent of people who died by suicide over the last two decades did not have a known mental health condition. On PBS NewsHour, Amna Nawaz talked with Dr. Liza Gold about risks, treatment and the scope of the problem.

Many Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Can Skip Chemo, Study Finds

The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer

Many Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients Can Skip Chemo, Study Finds

Most women with the most common form of early-stage breast cancer can safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of beating the disease, according to a landmark study that used genetic testing to gauge each patient’s risk. The results are expected to spare up to 70,000 patients a year in the United States and many more elsewhere the ordeal and expense of these drugs. A report from the Associated Press on PBS NewsHour's Health page.

This Digital Pill Wants to Make Following Your Prescription Easier

The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer

This Digital Pill Wants to Make Following Your Prescription Easier

Studies show that a majority of U.S. adults struggle with remembering to take their prescriptions, and now technology has been enlisted to help. A new clinical study is underway at 16 health centers around the country to see if a pill with an ingestible sensor can improve medication adherence rates for Hepatitis C drugs. A report from PBS NewsHour's Health team.